Intergang


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Intergang

(pop culture)
Picture a crime syndicate outfitted with ultraadvanced weaponry. That's exactly what writer/artist Jack Kirby imagined when he created Intergang (originally Inter-Gang) for his unified “Fourth World” titles for DC Comics. The first inkling of this organization's existence is shared in Kirby's Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #133 (1970), when media mogul Morgan Edge orders a hit on reporter Clark (Superman) Kent, fearing the investigator may be getting too close to Edge's covert criminal connections (the invulnerable Kent is, of course, quite hard to kill). Members of Intergang are first seen in Kirby's The Forever People #1 (1971), as a mishmash of Prohibition-style mobsters and uniformed operatives that pack high-tech heat supplied by Darkseid, lord of Apokolips. Readers discover as Kirby's epic unfolds that Intergang is providing Darkseid a toehold on Earth while orchestrating a plethora of street-level and international crimes from its Metropolis headquarters. Intergang originated in the 1920s under the leadership of Boss Moxie who, like so many other gangsters, was rubbed out by rivals. Morgan Edge revived the organization after Superman established residency in Metropolis, and was succeeded by tough-as-nails Bruno “Ugly” Mannheim; Vincent Edge, Morgan's father, ran Intergang for a while, as did ruthless businessman Lex Luthor in a hostile takeover. Rogue geneticist Dabney Donovan later cloned original Intergang mobsters to run Intergang, including Boss Moxie and strong arms Noose, “Torcher” McGee, and “Machine” Gunn. At various times Intergang has been served by three types of agents—Wall-Crawlers, Shock Troopers, and Gassers—although various superhumans have also been employed by the outfit. Intergang's bizarre Untouchables-meets-SPECTRE amalgam has provided a constant threat to Superman and to Metropolis' Special Crimes Unit. Intergang was spotlighted in the 1997 Superman animated episode “Tools of the Trade,” written by former Kirby assistant Mark Evanier and starring Bruce Weitz as the voice of Ugly Mannheim.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second major shift is that the truce will likely allow the gangs a respite from intergang fighting and a chance to consolidate their relationships with Mexican drug cartels and other TCOs from a position of increased strength.
The intergang conflict and power structure of the Ginzo clan also are less than clear.
Violence within gang life includes both intragang violence--for example, ritualistically violent initiations (Vigil and Long 1990)--and intergang violence--for example, turf battles (Sanchez-Jankowski 1991).
Sports and social events are offered to break down intergang barriers.
And as Levitt and Venkatesh add, intergang violence also frequently stems from the individual act of a particular gang member interested in moving up in the gang's hierarchy, which induces a rival gang to retaliate.
Finally, that some of this conflict was inspired and provoked by the homeboys suggests that not only did the homeboys control the girls in the auxiliary gangs by determining the arenas within which they could operate - the extent to which they were allowed to become involved in other gang activities such as intergang violence and drive-bys - they also even played a divisive role in the homegirls' relationships with each other.
It then seemed probable that gang members would be more racially biased than their uninvolved peers, especially if there is a history of intergang conflict.

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