interlude

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interlude,

development in the late 15th cent. of the English medieval morality play. Played between the acts of a long play, the interlude, treating intellectual rather than moral topics, often contained elements of satire or farce. The form developed in Italy as the intermedio and intermezzointermezzo
. 1 Any theatrical entertainment of a light nature performed between the divisions of a longer, more serious work. 2 In the 17th and 18th cent., a short independent comic scene with everyday characters was interpolated between acts of serious operas.
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, in France as the entremet or intermede and as the entrée, which involved only dance. In Spain the entremés became an independent form as in the work of Cervantes.

Bibliography

See E. K. Chambers, The Medieval Stage (1903); V. F. Hopper and G. B. Lahey, ed., Medieval Mysteries, Moralities and Interludes (1962).

Interlude

 

(1) A short musical or connecting piece played between the two main parts of a work: between acts in an opera or a play (more frequently known as an intermedium or intermezzo), between stanzas in a hymn (improvised on the organ), or between movements in a long musical piece such as a sonata or a suite.

(2) A type of drama popular in England in the late Middle Ages and early Renaissance. Initially a short stage play performed during festivals, the interlude (or intermedium) was one of the transitional forms between the morality play and the farce. In the early 16th century it became a vehicle of anticlerical satire in the works of J. Rastell and particularly of J. Heywood.

interlude

[′in·tər‚lüd]
(computer science)
A small routine or program which is designed to carry out minor preliminary calculations or housekeeping operations before the main routine begins to operate, and which can usually be overwritten after it has performed its function.

interlude

1. Theatre a short dramatic piece played separately or as part of a longer entertainment, common in 16th-century England
2. a brief piece of music, dance, etc., given between the sections of another performance