internal iliac artery

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internal iliac artery

[in′tərn·əl ¦il·ē‚ak ′ärd·ə·rē]
(anatomy)
The medial terminal division of the common iliac artery.
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A 36-year-old woman received a technically successful embolization of internal iliac artery trunk, but the hemodynamic instability persisted.
Internal iliac artery: This runs infero-medially after the pelvic brim and is the major vascular supply of the pelvic cavity.
Trail of ALUM and dicynone instillation were unsuccessful in controlling the hematuria, so the decision for redo cystoscopy was made, and we found a diffuse uncontrollable bladder wall bleeding; therefore bilateral internal iliac angioembolization was done and it was successful in controlling the hematuria, leading finally to Hemodynamic stability of the patient.
Given that significant hemorrhage can occur during this procedure, adjunct procedures can be used to minimize blood loss including internal iliac balloon occlusion and internal iliac ligation.
Unsuccessful bleeding control, progressive growth of hematoma, and failure to provide hemodynamic stability may require laparotomy and ligation of bleeding vessel or ligation of the internal iliac artery.
The aberrant obturator artery is an accessory artery arising from the external iliac system beside coexistence with the obturator artery itself normally arising from the internal iliac artery.
(a) Left internal iliac artery angiography showing dilated intrauterine arteries and extravasation (arrows).
Two patients were lost to follow-up, but of the remaining 22 patients (25 sandwich grafts), 24 (96%) of the external iliac limbs were patent and 24 of the internal iliac limbs were patent.
For instance, the left renal vein can become compressed between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (the nutcracker syndrome), or the left common iliac vein can be compressed between the overlying right internal iliac artery and the underlying vertebral body (May-Thurner syndrome).
The first-of-its-kind device is used in conjunction with the Gore Excluder AAA Endoprosthesis to isolate the common iliac artery from systemic blood flow and preserve blood flow in the external iliac and internal iliac arteries--a group of arteries located in the pelvis.
The permeable aortic distal lumen gives rise to two well opacified voluminous lumbar collateral arteries, establishing anastomoses with internal iliac arteries.
[1] The viability of the affected lower limb is maintained by an important collateral network between the internal iliac and profunda arteries.