public works

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public works

[′pəb·lik ′wərks]
(industrial engineering)
Government-owned and financed works and improvements for public enjoyment or use.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second internal improvement initiative was a corporate restructuring to streamline the organisational structure and make operations more customer-focused.
The internal improvements controversy is thus both analogous and
Fourth, internal improvements increased economic and political stability by "strengthening the interest of distant states in each other" (Cary 1844, p.
Besides constant work on improving software products, Auslogics has implemented some internal improvements intended to ensure higher customer satisfaction.
The refurbishment has also included internal improvements to decor throughout the lounge and restaurant, the development of a colourful out door courtyard with stunning hanging baskets and seating areas and a kiddie's corner to keep the little ones happy.
Each of these features Toyota Optimal Drive, which includes a range of advanced technologies and internal improvements such as the use of super-lightweight engine components and transmissions; the minimisation of mechanical losses through the Valvematic with the 1.
So far the scheme has run on budget - although 7% of tenants have declined the internal improvements.
The main reasons for growth cited were improvement in demand from emerging markets, internal improvements in products and services and changes to the business environment such as low interest rates and the favourable exchange rate.
Jefferson's plan to tackle the debt was relatively simple: cut spending by reducing the number of federal jobs (which totaled only 130 when he took office); put the navy in dry dock and dramatically scale back the army; and curtail most internal improvements that could be otherwise managed by the states.
He advocated an "American System" of internal improvements to consolidate the empire and bridge sectional divisions.
An expert on historic architecture and engineering, Kapsch describes how topography and the need to get cotton to market made South Carolina an avid participant in the nation's canal boom, spending more money per capita on internal improvements than any other state in the Union.
The city council says carrying out the roof replacement at the same time as the internal improvements is the most cost-effective method.