internal wave

(redirected from Internal waves)

internal wave

[in′tərn·əl ′wāv]
(fluid mechanics)
A wave motion of a stably stratified fluid in which the maximum vertical motion takes place below the surface of the fluid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Internal waves are an intrinsic constituent of dynamics of all stratified water bodies, having a particular role in the functioning of the entire ecosystem of seas and oceans.
Away from ocean boundaries, the spatiotemporal patterns of mixing are largely driven by the geography of generation, propagation, and dissipation of internal waves, which supply much of the power for turbulent mixing.
However, their model was not able to reproduce the observed abyssal mixing: Instead of generating turbulence, the internal waves ping-ponged between two vertical bands of water on either side of the equator and the smooth seafloor without breaking.
To use the oil floating on vinegar analogy again, internal waves are the undulations at the interface between the two components of your salad dressing.
Based on the monitoring and measured data collected from the South China Sea, strong underwater currents caused by internal waves could be a serious threat to underwater structures, such as oil drilling platforms or supporting cylinders [2].
The evolution of long internal waves (IWs) with small amplitudes in a stably stratified fluid is governed approximately by a linear wave equation, with small but cumulative corrections due to weak nonlinearity, dispersion and dissipation, and possibly to a slowly varying background.
In [16], the author considers the three-dimensional reflection and diffraction properties of internal waves in the sea.
El Nino is covered along with the internal waves that propagate deep in the ocean, along the boundary between warm surface waters and cold deep water.
Morison, 1985: Internal waves in the Arctic Ocean: Comparison with lower-latitude observations.
At the junction of the "T," a 3-D array of oceanography sensors was deployed to examine fine-scale patterns of ocean internal waves, a key topic of interest for both Lynch and the experiment.
1] as found elsewhere, which is faster than might be expected from traditional shear dispersion by persistent mesoscale flow and linear internal waves.