homophobia

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homophobia

intense hatred or fear of homosexuals or homosexuality

homophobia

the fear of HOMOSEXUALITY. Although there has been some suggestion that homophobia may exist as a personality trait, it is more fruitful to examine the social conditions under which homosexual behaviour is proscribed (in England and Wales this happened in 1885, when male homosexuality was criminalized), and becomes an organizing principle for particular roles, identities and subcultures (Weeks, 1977).
References in periodicals archive ?
In some instances, adjudicators have been attuned to the issue of internalized homophobia in sexual minority refugee cases, particularly when soliciting testimony about same-sex sexual relationships.
In many cases, participants were not even aware that they had residual internalized homophobia after having been out for many years.
An LGB individual may experience internalized homophobia and subsequent distress in response to the discrepancy between one's attraction to the same gender and how society negatively views such same-gender attraction.
These factors help to strengthen and reinforce the power of internalized homophobia in an individual's psyche.
Expressions of internalized distaste or discomfort with Jewishness or internalized homophobia can contribute to inter-group partnering factors.
The insidious nature of internalized homophobia is that a client is unlikely to know he or she has been affected by it.
Internalized homophobia can be more painful and obstructive to health than external forms of oppression.
The founding women of Brotha's and Sista's identified a lack of information and gaps in services around domestic violence, substance abuse, STDs, cervical cancer, and internalized homophobia as some of the most pressing health challenges facing the community at that time.
Sometimes this connection between religious belief and internalized homophobia is accurate.
Internalized homophobia, with its self-doubt and shame, may make some feel they can not develop any relationship at all.
Mayer deals with potentially explosive material by using boxing as a metaphor for internalized homophobia - for wanting something, yet feeling you must be beaten up for wanting it.
Students from a wide variety of backgrounds learn how to treat the underlying causes of internalized homophobia that result in substance abuse, depression and domestic violence, and to empower LGBT clients to lead lives of dignity, self-worth and romantic/sexual health.