International Labor Organization


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International Labor Organization

(ILO), specialized agency of the United Nations, with headquarters in Geneva. It was created in 1919 by the Versailles Treaty and affiliated with the League of Nations until 1945, when it voted to sever ties with the League. In 1946 it became the first specialized agency of the United Nations. Although not a member of the League, the United States joined the ILO in 1934. Through international action and by bringing together representatives of government, employers, and labor, the ILO seeks to improve labor conditions, promote a higher standard of living, and further social justice. Promotion of international accord on such matters as regulation of hours of work, provision of adequate wages, protection of workers against occupational disease and injury, and protection of women and children and of those who work outside their own countries (who may be forced into labor through deceptive recruiting practices) accounts for much of its activities. The ILO consists of a general conference of representatives of the members (four from each member state—two from the government, an employer, and a worker) that meets once a year, a governing body of 56 people (28 representing governments, 14 employers, and 14 labor) that meets three times a year, and an International Labor Office controlled by the governing body. The ILO is financed by contributions from member states; 187 countries belong to the organization. Protesting the political policies of the organization, the United States withdrew from the ILO between 1977 and 1980. The ILO received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1969. The organization puts out a number of publications containing statistics on labor and advice for workers.

Bibliography

See D. A. Morse, The Origin and Evolution of the I.L.O. and Its Role in the World Community (1969); C. W. Jenks, Social Justice and the Law of Nations (1970); A. E. Alcock, History of the International Labour Organisation (1971); V. Y. Ghebali, The International Labour Organisation (1989); M. Imber, The USA, ILO, UNESCO and IAEA (1989).

International Labor Organization

(I.L.O.) agency of the United Nations; aim is to improve labor and living conditions. [World Hist.: EB, V: 389–390]
See: Labor
References in periodicals archive ?
It is emphasized by Iranian Labor Minister Assadollah Abbasi the requirement for broader cooperation among the member-states of the International Labor Organization (ILO) in mid-June.
The International Labor Organization report, released last year, offered several grim statistics: nearly half of Afghans don't have enough to eat; 18 percent of children under 15 years old are working; and 82 percent of Afghans are illiterate.
She said the committee must work in collaboration with the International Labor Organization in order to reduce the number of working children.
International Labor Organization (ILO) and a local nongovernmental organization.
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The researchers point out that foreign direct investment is positively correlated with the number of International Labor Organization conventions ratified, and that multinational investment "is positively correlated with the right to establish free unions, the right to strike, the right to collective bargaining, and the protection of union members.
He is currently living in Geneva, Switzerland, working for the International Labor Organization (ILO) and completing a book, An Amateur's Guide to Running Effective Meetings.
According to a report issued by the International Labor Organization (ILO) in 2000, 700 old ships end their lives every year on beaches in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, China, Vietnam and other Asian countries, where there are few environmental or worker protection laws.
The International Labor Organization reports that up to 9 million hotel and tourism workers could lose their jobs as a result of this slowdown.
Meanwhile, officials of the International Labor Organization, who visited Rangoon last month, were barred from meeting Suu Kyi.
He would leave child labor, for example, to the International Labor Organization, though it has been working on the problem since its founding in the 1920's.

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