Internet Protocol version 4


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Internet Protocol version 4

(networking, protocol)
The version of Internet Protocol in widespread use in 2000.
References in periodicals archive ?
NASA has enabled its main website at www.nasa.gov and about 75 other agency-related websites to support both Internet Protocol version 4 and version 6.
The end of IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4) addresses was announced in a ceremony in Miami last week.
The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) distributed the last five 'blocks' of Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4), each with 16.8 million IP addresses, to regional groups last week.
A shrinking storehouse of available web addresses based upon Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) is estimated at less than one per cent, forcing a new era of web IP address allocation under next-generation IPv6.
4 February 2011 -- The online world is set for a broad change, after the last pack of web addresses of the Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) iteration, the format governing web locations since the early days of the net, was awarded yesterday, the Financial Times reports.
The DSR series supports Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) and next generation IPv6.
This is because the current addressing system, known as IPv4 (internet protocol version 4), is a 32-bit data system that can "only" accommodate some four billion unique addresses.
Most networked equipment uses Internet Protocol version 4, or IPv4, which provides for about four billion 32-bit IP addresses.
IPv4 refers to Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4), which is the fourth revision in the development of the Internet Protocol (IP) and it is the first version of the protocol to be widely deployed on a global basis.
Cisco instructors Teare and Paquet bill this text as an "all-in-one" guide to "what you need to know, why you need to know it, and how to apply this knowledge to create a campus network that includes as many or as few of today's technologies as you require." They open with one chapter introducing the network design process and two network design models, followed by chapters describing available technologies and reasons why they might be included in networks, covering switching design, Internet Protocol version 4 routing design, network security design, wireless local area network design, quality of service design, voice transport design, content networking design, network management design, and other enabling technologies.
"It is not surprising that IPv6 is playing such a significant role in IT purchasing decisions, as the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has required the transition from Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) to next generation IPv6 by June 2008," said Peter Tseronis, director of Network Services for the U.S.

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