Interpenetrate


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Interpenetrate

A decorative feature, such as a molding, that enters another element, such as a column, and reappears on the other side; it was commonly found in the Gothic Revival style.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
argues, as the subtitle suggests, that charity and knowledge interpenetrate (cooperate) in their descent to the particulars of every human act.
"Experience," he explains, can be defined "metaphysically as a process composed of relational elements called feelings" which interpenetrate one another at both conscious and unconscious levels (278).
Altoon had by the mid-'60s seized the airbrush to produce works that brought line and color together, even if, as in the above example, they touch rather than fully interpenetrate. While his calligraphy remains, these later pieces also allow for tricks unburdened by gesture.
Despite its name, the two networks hardly interpenetrate truly at a molecular level, because of the inherent immiscibility of most polymer pairs [12-14].
It also indicates, in Schutz's case, garish and viscerally satisfying color; extreme yet always reversible distortion; humor of the dismemberment-is-libidinally-liberating kind; a stretchiness of mass and contour, so that persons, objects, and settings interpenetrate; and a sense of narrative constructed through simple gestures.
The Walker Art Center's "Brave New Worlds," curated by Doryun Chong and Yasmil Raymond, features twenty-four artists from around the globe and presents artistic practice as a means of exploring place and time in a world flattened by digital technologies, spectacle, and "free trade." Like Jorge Macchi's Liliput, 2007, included in the show, in which national boundaries are cut apart and reconstructed into unfamiliar continents through chance correspondence, "Brave New Worlds" features artists from countries that are geographically distant from one another, but whose cultures, economies, populations, and political systems interpenetrate.
In many situations, however, the polymers interpenetrate at the interface such that a gradual change in polymer concentration occurs across a very thin interdiffusion region.
Looking across the floor area of the foundation's main hall or the installation at Castello di Rivoli, works appear to interpenetrate. There are no plinths, frames, or privileged points of view: no straight lines.
And Gober implicates us in this debacle: Again, private and public spheres touch (the bathers next to the crucifix), even interpenetrate (the bodies drawn on top of the newspapers); and we readers of the Times seem passive compared to the implicit crusaders of the headless Christ.
Similar layerings occur in the films, in which lap dissolves repeatedly interpenetrate one image into another, and in the spoken-word recordings, where hesitancies and loopings multiply the single voice.
But the interpretation of Joo's work lies not so much in the identification of such dichotomies as in understanding how these seemingly opposed terms interpenetrate each other to the point where they become inextricable, placing the viewer in a state of suspension.
It's a powerful form of prayer that focuses intentions, uniting them with the energy that interpenetrates all things.