interpersonal therapy


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interpersonal therapy

[‚in·tə‚pər·sən·əl ′ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
A form of psychotherapy in which emphasis is placed on enhancing the patient's ability to cope with stresses, improving interpersonal communications, increasing morale, and helping the patient deal with the effects of the depressive disorder.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
CBT and interpersonal therapy are the two main types of psychotherapy used in depression.
Various forms of psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT), are helpful for treating mild-to-moderate forms of depression.
Some therapists work using a single psychological model such as cognitive behavioural therapy, interpersonal therapy or cognitive analytic therapy.
Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and Interpersonal therapy (IPT) for adolescents show effectiveness in teens.
After reviewing the evidence, the USPSTF found a moderate net benefit for counseling interventions, particularly cognitive-behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy, for preventing perinatal depression in women at risk.
Another type of talk therapy, called interpersonal therapy, focuses on resolving interpersonal problems and social functioning issues.
Less promising, and with insufficient evidence to recommend, according to the ISTSS, are brief interpersonal therapy, brief individual trauma processing therapy, telephone-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and nurse-led intensive care recovery programs.
(2017) reported that differences in therapist effectiveness in therapists practicing interpersonal therapy for depression are partly explained by therapists' capacity to elicit and maintain autonomous motivation in their clients by providing high levels of warmth in the therapeutic relationship.
He addresses diagnosis, differential diagnosis, anger triggers, anger styles, and those labeled as passive-aggressive when they are not; victims and helping them; and treatment, including psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy, cognitive therapy, interpersonal therapy, transference and countertransference issues, and anger management.
Examples include cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, psychoanalysis, family therapy, insight training, light therapy (for seasonal affective disorder) and electroconvulsant therapy (for refractory cases).
There is strong evidence that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT) help women overcome their depression, says Dr.

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