interview

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interview

a method of collecting social data at the INDIVIDUAL LEVEL. This face-to-face method ensures a higher RESPONSE RATE than POSTAL QUESTIONNAIRES, but can introduce INTERVIEWER BIAS by the effect different interviewers have on the quality VALIDITY and RELIABILITY of the data so collected.

Interviews may be structured, with the interviewer asking set questions and the respondents’ replies being immediately categorized. This format allows ease of analysis and less possibility of interviewer bias, but the data will not be as ‘rich’ as that elicited by an unstructured design (and may be subject to problems such as MEASUREMENT BY FIAT – see also CICOUREL). Unstructured interviews are desirable when the initial exploration of an area is being made, and hypotheses for further investigation being generated, or when the depth of the data required is more important than ease of analysis. See QUALITATIVE RESEARCH and QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES.

References in periodicals archive ?
Nonparametric Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test (two-tailed) was used for comparing paired pre and post-MMI ratings of interviewers because of the skewed data.
Technical questions are absolutely critical as well, but, if the interview is completely focused around the technical capabilities, an interviewer may not have the opportunity to understand the candidate as a human being.
Smart employment interviewers probe to discover past behavior: "What did you say to your boss when you learned you were assigned to a different shift?
Much of the time, interviewers feel that they've educated or informed themselves enough to successfully wing it-even if the topics they cover are as wide-ranging as medical advances on one hand and ethnic minorities at the other end
Interviewer to Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp: "It seems one week you are very good and the next week you are really poor.
Essentially, your interviewer is just getting a feel for you as a potential candidate and wants to be sure you're worth their time.
A tacit assumption long held by many researchers is that interviewees give the most accurate information on their sexual behaviour to interviewers of the same gender (11).
Interviewers must be cautious, however, to avoid tipping off the subject to information they know.
It's always hard to judge your performance objectively, but interviewers can do this.
Ask intelligent questions: Asking the right questions definitely makes a good impression on the interviewer.
In 13 peer-reviewed papers based on presentations at an October 2011 workshop in Castle Rauischholzhausen, survey specialists explore the prevalence and consequence of interviewers deviating from standard practice while conducting surveys in social science and marketing research.
Indeed, although interviewers and recruiters may have a checklist of business or technical skills that they're looking for, research has found that they emotionally and unconsciously gravitate towards potential hires that make them feel comfortable, those that can relate to or share their culture.