Intestinal Lavage

Intestinal Lavage

 

hydrotherapeutic procedures whereby feces, bacteria, mucus, pus, fermentation and putrefaction products, and intestinal excreta are removed from the intestine.

Drinking water, disinfectant solutions, solutions that liquefy mucus, and mineral water are used in performing intestinal lavage. The procedure usually involves the introduction of liquids into the intestine by enema, siphonage, submerged intestinal bath, and special instruments. An ascending intestinal douche is often used in health resorts and sanatoriums. Occasionally the liquid is introduced directly into the duodenum through a tube. Intestinal lavage is used mainly in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases and metabolic disorders (constipation, dyspepsia, colitis, heavy-metal poisoning, gout, diabetes mellitus). The procedure is contraindicated in the presence of ulcers and intestinal tumors.

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The young woman was admitted to the intensive care unit of the hospital and was saved after conducting a intestinal lavage procedure.
Today visitors come from all the world to see one of England's last working Victorian Turkish Baths and discover more about the original treatments which included intestinal lavage for colitis and constipation and Peat Baths to treat circulation, back and pelvic disorders, rheumatism and sciatica.