gastrointestinal tract

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gastrointestinal tract

[¦ga·strō‚in′tes·tən·əl ′trakt]
(anatomy)
The stomach and intestine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biochemical and morphological developments are practically impaired in intestinal mucosa from growing pigs fed reduced-protein diets supplemented with crystalline amino acids.
Isolation of Helicobacter pylori from the intestinal mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease [abstract].
Although calprotectin can be found throughout the body, FC is of most relevance to gastrointestinal disease since the calprotectin in stool is directly related to the quantity of neutrophils infiltrating the inflamed intestinal mucosa and consequently is a surrogate marker of inflammation.
Light microscopic examination of the intestinal mucosa of control rats showed a normal architecture of villi, crypts and enterocytes.
Histopathologic changes included epithelial cell shedding; intrinsic layer hemorrhage and excessive infiltration of lymphocytes in the stomach; and congestion, edema, and epithelial cell shedding in the intestinal mucosa (Figure, panel B).
6-14) In such a study, Moss et al (6) had reported presence of fragmented DNA in the intestinal mucosa of treatment-naive patients with celiac disease, which disappeared after administration of gluten-free diet.
Severe inflammation of the intestinal mucosa is a key part of the development of mucositis and is a major characteristic of the condition.
As with roundworm a heavy worm burden may contribute to malnutrition, stunted growth in childhood and sometimes mechanical damage of the intestinal mucosa, diarrhoea and prolapsed rectum.
Leukocytapheresis is an extracorporeal removal of activated granulocytes and monocytes, representing the major source of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the intestinal mucosa, from the blood using special filters or columns.
This association suggests a possible immune reaction mediated within the intestinal mucosa.
This deficiency in turn effects the absorption in the terminal ileum as gastric mucosal cells are required for transport through the intestinal mucosa.
1) As the bezoar enlarges, it causes compression and mechanical irritation of the intestinal mucosa, leading to complications such as chronic inflammation, ulceration, perforation, intussusception and obstruction.

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