Inula


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Related to Inula: Inula helenium

Inula

 

a genus of herbaceous perennials, sometimes bushes, of the family Compositae. The leaves are entire. The flower heads are either large and solitary or small and numerous, for the most part forming cymose inflorescences. The florets are usually yellow, with the central ones being bell-shaped and the outer ones, strap-shaped. There are about 150 species (up to 200 according to other data) in Eurasia and Africa, but chiefly in the Mediterranean region. In the USSR there are more than 30 species, primarily in the mountains of the Caucasus and Middle Asia. A widespread variety is elecampane (/. helenium), which is found in moist places near bodies of water, in thickets, deciduous and pine forests, and in meadows. Its rhizome and roots contain inulin and volatile oil, including alantolactone. Preparations of elecampane are used as expectorants. There are Inula species that are used as ornamentals and for dyes.

REFERENCES

Avetisian, V. E. “Kavkazskie predstaviteli rodaInula L.” In Trudy Botanicheskogo instituta AN Armianskoi SSR, vol. 11. Yerevan, 1958.
Atlas lekarstvennykh rastenii SSSR. Moscow, 1962.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ethnographic analogies with contemporary hunter-gatherer societies would suggest that soft plant tissues could have been used by Palaeolithic groups for a variety of reasons including as food staples or food flavourings, for medicinal uses or for other purposes (the edible roots of Inula may, for instance, also be used as a dye; Plants far a Future n.
Calamagrostis epigeios, Festuca arundinacea, Brachypodium pinnatum, and Inula salicina appeared to be good indicators of abandonment.
Manager Inula Stevens said: "They sat at the bar for 45 minutes enjoying a drink before heading into the bistro at the back for a bite to eat.
The non-toxic compound, extracted from the Inula plant, is a rapid, convenient and inexpensive treatment for plant fungal disease.
For example, the 1,10-seco-eudesmanolide sesquiterpene 1,6-0,0-diacetylbritannilactone isolated from Inula britannica induces apoptosis associated with activation of caspase-8, -9 and -3, phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Bid, and increased release of cytochrome c from mitochondria in HL-60 (Pan et al.
More than likely the botanical name helenium is related to another autumn flowering herbaceous border plant, Inula helenium, a member of the same daisy family, but one firmly rooted in the native of habitat of Greece.
The herbaceous borders are almost dominated by them, with garden gems such as anthemis, achillea, erigeron, gaillardia, inula, liatris, osteospermum and solidago.
TYPE: Tenorea berteri Colla [= Trixis inula Crantz].
Inula salicina was also called by names of other species first introduced in Estonia as medicinal plants (ingver, alant).
X Solanum americanum X Solanum eleagnifolium X Solanum triquetrum X X Spartina spartinae X X X X X X Sporobolus pyramidatus X Sporobolus virginicus X X X X X X X X Sporobolus wrightii X X X X X X X Suaeda linearis X X X X X X Trixis inula X Typha domingensis X X X X X X Urochloa maxima X X X Xylothamia palmeri X Yucca treculeana X Table 9.
Other nectar-rich flowers such as honesty, aubrieta, bergenias, inula, hebe, lavender, French marigolds, sedums or ice plants, thyme, hyssop and marjoram are also great magnets for butterflies, so use them to fill gaps in your flowerbeds.
While several bucket loads of the evacuees were scattered in an untidy corner to serve as ground cover if they survive my rough handling, a crop of inula seedlings, which have also rooted in the path will be potted up for future use.