Inula


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Inula: Inula helenium
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Inula

 

a genus of herbaceous perennials, sometimes bushes, of the family Compositae. The leaves are entire. The flower heads are either large and solitary or small and numerous, for the most part forming cymose inflorescences. The florets are usually yellow, with the central ones being bell-shaped and the outer ones, strap-shaped. There are about 150 species (up to 200 according to other data) in Eurasia and Africa, but chiefly in the Mediterranean region. In the USSR there are more than 30 species, primarily in the mountains of the Caucasus and Middle Asia. A widespread variety is elecampane (/. helenium), which is found in moist places near bodies of water, in thickets, deciduous and pine forests, and in meadows. Its rhizome and roots contain inulin and volatile oil, including alantolactone. Preparations of elecampane are used as expectorants. There are Inula species that are used as ornamentals and for dyes.

REFERENCES

Avetisian, V. E. “Kavkazskie predstaviteli rodaInula L.” In Trudy Botanicheskogo instituta AN Armianskoi SSR, vol. 11. Yerevan, 1958.
Atlas lekarstvennykh rastenii SSSR. Moscow, 1962.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
They were supplemented with 0.1% to 0.5% Inula Britannica flower extract.
Phenological Episodes and Reproductive Strategies of Inula racemosa (Asteraceae)-A Critically Endangered Medicinal Herb of North West Himalaya.
Fu et al., "Japonicones A-D, bioactive dimeric sesquiterpenes from Inula japonica Thunb," Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, vol.
Natu, "New sesquiterpene lactones from Inula species," Phytochemistry, vol.
STM is a sesquiterpene lactone compound present in various plant species such as Inula helenium, Inula japonica [12], Magnoliagrandiflora L.
sphaerostachya, Matthiola tricuspidata and Inula viscosa II in 1; Sonchus bulbosus, Allium commutatum, Allium roseum, Atriplex prostrata, Carduus cephalanthus, Glebionis segetum, Crepis bellidifolia, Dianthus sylvestris subsp.
Just last week I saw an image and description of Inula Hookeriana on social media posted from a garden in China and I instantly felt a connection with a fellow plant enthusiast across the globe.
Zhang, Chemical Constituents from Inula nervosa Wall, Nat.