Invasion from Mars

Invasion from Mars

Orson Welles’s broadcast; terrified a credulous America (1938). [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 468]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
THEY may look like an alien invasion from Mars but these amorphous blobs are actually creatures from the deep blue.
But Schwartz interweaves strong chapters covering the shoddy journalism that framed the event and the role of 1940's The Invasion from Mars, a famous but flawed social science text, in perpetuating the panic legend.
Among the topics are the Invasion from Mars and its legacy for mass communication scholarship, interwar wireless scares in cross-national comparison, CBS News' coverage of the D-Day invasion, interconnection and embodiment in Howard Stern's 9/11 radio broadcast, social media curation and journalistic reporting on the Arab Spring, and information needs and online narratives during two "bombing" events in Nairobi.
When a study is named, the most common reference is to Hadley Cantril's The Invasion from Mars (1940), which is said to document the "mass panic" caused by Orson Welles" famed 1938 "War of the Worlds" broadcast (see Figure 1).
citizen," reported Time, "the screaming headlines of the German smash through Belgium and down into France came like an unremitting, seven-day Orson Welles broadcast of an invasion from Mars."
Would the world tolerate it, unless it is distracted by an invasion from Mars?
A meteor strike in southern California turns out to be the vanguard of an invasion from Mars, as a force of deadly war machines emerges to wipe the human race from the face of the Earth.
Twenty eight years after its original release, this is the first ever live tour of the musical version of HG Wells' novel of an alien invasion from Mars. The live show however, is a mixture of musical concert, theatre performance and technological exhibition.
The novel told of an invasion from Mars. Aliens in giant metal tripods shot beams of fire and poison gas and laid waste all in their path.
Panic broke out in the US in 1938 when a Welles radio broadcast, based on the War of the Worlds novel, sounded like an official newsflash about an invasion from Mars.
The broadcast used the newly established genre of radio news broadcast and eye witness reporting as a the structure for the science fiction tale of an invasion from Mars (based on the story by H.G.