Invective


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Invective

 

a harsh denunciation or satirical mockery of a real individual or group of individuals, usually accompanied by some displacement in the reality of the portrayal. Invective is characterized by a two-dimensional quality of structure and meaning, which often emphasizes personal accusations for the purpose of public denigration.

The literary forms of invective are varied and include epigrams (by Martial) and polemical articles and speeches (Cicero’s Philippics). Invective was employed by Aristophanes in the comedies Knights and Clouds, by Catullus in his lyrics, by Erasmus in Praise of Folly, and by Diderot in Rameau’s Nephew. The term “invective” is rarely used.

References in periodicals archive ?
These nameless buffoons that deliver all the invective will not be having a eureka moment
Rather, these plays do not really participate in the type of back-and-forth dialogue between opposing texts and plays seen in the other chapters in Railing, Reviling, and Invective. However, the book's closing chapter on the "misandronic railings" (179) of Jane Anger, Constantia Munda, and Jane Sharp returns to that structure.
(10) William Fitzgerald's groundbreaking study (1988) argued for the interrelation between the political, invective, and erotic poems of the Epodes, and has laid the foundation for much later criticism focused on the sociopolitical context of the Epodes' production and on Roman sexuality.
With regard to the core of the book, constituted by the first six chapters, Rao provides an implicit ordering principle parallel to the chronological one, and although it is not expressly formulated, we can refer to it as the "virulence principle." It seems indeed that the development of the invective is accompanied by an escalation in its bitterness: "[Bruni] acted as a transitional figure in the development of the genre from a sober, restrained accusatory or defensive oration to a merciless, vicious catalogue of crimes, real and imaginary" (39).
The letters published on Wednesday were sheer invective and did nothing to advance the debate.
You hypothesize that Savage's homophobic "invective," in this case his railing over Melissa Etheridge's Oscar speech, didn't go over well at CAA, which has gay-friendly clients and an openly gay partner.
It is the eventful life story of the elephant bull Mayafudi (from the Afrikaans invective 'maaifoedie'--rascal).
Sure, the constant and indiscriminate invective that the right poured on Bill Clinton and that the left has poured on George W.
From a petulant, invective poem against bumblebees to enjoying and celebrating the pleasure of an anniversary to the haunting analogy between creating a house for wrens to nest in and trying to become pregnant, What Feeds Us paints sublimely with descriptive language, sometimes plain-spoken, sometimes obliquely surreptitious.
Given his over-flowing enthusiasm for the game, there was no chance Nixon would die wondering after being given such a late chance at the top level - and he has wasted no time getting stuck in, most notably when he launched his extraordinary invective at Michael Hussey who refused to walk after nicking behind at the Gabba on Friday.
The more anti-4x4 invective I read, the more I think it's a carefully orchestrated campaign by the green lobby.
For the past three-plus decades, journalists have uniformly felt obligated--as though ordered by some invisible Central Committee--to lard all of their "news" reports and editorials on Pinochet with demonizing epithets and invective. "Brutal dictator." "Torture." "Murder." "Terror." "Bloody." "Tyrant." "Despot." "Cruel." These are some of the more commonly used terms that seem to be compulsory when mentioning Gen.