Compton scattering

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Compton scattering

(komp -tŏn) (Compton effect) An interaction between a photon of electromagnetic radiation and a charged particle, such as an electron, in which some of the photon's energy is given to the particle. The photon is therefore reradiated at a lower frequency (i.e. with a lower energy) and the particle's energy is increased. In inverse Compton emission the reverse process takes place: photons of low frequency are scattered by moving charged particles and reradiated at a higher frequency.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Compton scattering

[¦käm·tən ¦skad·ə·riŋ]
(quantum mechanics)
The elastic scattering of photons by electrons. Also known as Compton process; gamma-ray scattering.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, substituting the number of photons [N.sub.[gamma]] per shot produced via inverse Compton scattering, Eq.
And at the highest frequencies, Lazzati would invoke an altogether different emission mechanism: inverse Compton scattering, where energetic electrons knock into a photon and bump it up to higher energies.
Inverse Compton scattering: collisions between photons and energetic nuclei that transfer energy to the former.

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