inverse-square law

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inverse-square law

[′in‚vərs ¦skwer ‚lȯ]
(physics)
Any law in which a physical quantity varies with distance from a source inversely as the square of that distance.

inverse-square law

inverse-square law
A law which applies to a light source (or to a sound source) that is in a space far away from any reflecting surface: the intensity at a point, as measured on a surface which is perpendicular to a line drawn between the point and the source, varies inversely with the square of the distance between the point and the source. (For sound waves, this decrease in intensity is equivalent to a drop in sound-pressure level of 6 dB for each doubling of distance from the source.)
References in periodicals archive ?
With that in hand, they could easily calculate the distance to the other with the inverse-square method.
Realizing that the cost penalty was exponential, Geaslin's rule, the Inverse-Square Rule for Deferred Maintenance, was created, which states: If a part is known to be failing, and the repair is deferred and allowed to remain in service until the next level of failure, the resultant expense will be the square of the failed part.
When the size-doubling T-score ratios for recognition and recall are themselves treated as a ratio, we have an inter-gender size-doubling ratio that is an inverse-square.
Another supporting argument is that the small and stealthy UCAV is survivable enough to get closer to the threat emitter, allowing the inverse-square law to work to an advantage.
Recognition of the laws of motion and of the inverse-square law of universal gravitation were strongly linked with each other, since motions of planets and comets provide the clearest test for any theory of motion.
An interesting example is the borrowing of Newton's inverse-square law by international trade theorists in economics.
If it is as fast, one would expect inverse-square law attenuation of the psi signal.
The inverse-square law of sound intensity decrease with distance would apply: every doubling of distance from the sound source reduces the sound intensity by 6 dB.
Testing the inverse-square law of gravity in boreholes at the Nevada Test Site.
The brainchild of astronomer Mordehai Milgrom, MOND posits that when gravity gets really weak--as it does in the outskirts of galaxies--it no longer follows Isaac Newton's inverse-square law.