inverse-square law

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inverse-square law

[′in‚vərs ¦skwer ‚lȯ]
(physics)
Any law in which a physical quantity varies with distance from a source inversely as the square of that distance.

inverse-square law

inverse-square law
A law which applies to a light source (or to a sound source) that is in a space far away from any reflecting surface: the intensity at a point, as measured on a surface which is perpendicular to a line drawn between the point and the source, varies inversely with the square of the distance between the point and the source. (For sound waves, this decrease in intensity is equivalent to a drop in sound-pressure level of 6 dB for each doubling of distance from the source.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The final measurement in this group of related experiments was a test of the inverse-square law of gravitation on the scale of meters to kilometers.
They recognized that short-range deviations from the inverse-square law would cause gravity to increase at a rate different than that calculated using 1/[r.
0 mm--large enough to be detectable but small enough not to be ruled out by tests of the inverse-square law to date.
If those dimensions exist, gravity in the submillimeter range would increase not according to Newton's inverse-square law but in inverse proportion to the fourth power of the separation.
He admits, however, that he was unable to master the mathematics required to show how elliptical orbits arise from an inverse-square law.
Acknowledging that Newton had succeeded in solving the mathematical problem but incensed that his own name is not mentioned in a section of Newton's treatise recently read at a Royal Society meeting, Hooke has demanded that Newton give him proper credit in the Principia for the inverse-square law.
All three of these types of experiments--G measurements, Equivalence Principle and inverse-square law tests--however, are static measurements in the sense that the test masses were not free to move beyond a small distance compared to the size of the source mass.
Test of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law at Laboratory Distances.