inverse-square law

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inverse-square law

[′in‚vərs ¦skwer ‚lȯ]
(physics)
Any law in which a physical quantity varies with distance from a source inversely as the square of that distance.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

inverse-square law

inverse-square law
A law which applies to a light source (or to a sound source) that is in a space far away from any reflecting surface: the intensity at a point, as measured on a surface which is perpendicular to a line drawn between the point and the source, varies inversely with the square of the distance between the point and the source. (For sound waves, this decrease in intensity is equivalent to a drop in sound-pressure level of 6 dB for each doubling of distance from the source.)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
29 July 2019 - Indiana, US-based communications SaaS provider Kerauno has acquired Indianapolis, US-based custom software development firm Inverse-Square, to boost engineering staff and add bandwidth in service and operations, the company said.
When the distance between the specimen and light source, and the intensity of the light source are fixed, the amount of the light received by the crack is reduced by the inverse-square law [11-13], and the theoretical value can be obtained by (1).
Hooke is known as the man who dared challenge Newton as discoverer of the inverse-square law of gravitational attraction.
The "Inverse-Square Rule for Deferred Maintenance" teaches that deferring maintenance can produce risk/reward ratios from 15:1 to 40:1 if allowed to become a breakdown event.
If Hooke is remembered at all, it's for actions during his prime years, when he became a controversial figure for publicly claiming credit for Isaac Newton's inverse-square law of gravity.
More recently, in the human social context (Freckleton and Sutherland, 2001), inverse-square relationships were found for self-regulated time series (like the length of waiting lists to see hospital consultants) and for unregulated, random-walk time series, a generalization with applications in forecasting and management.
Another supporting argument is that the small and stealthy UCAV is survivable enough to get closer to the threat emitter, allowing the inverse-square law to work to an advantage.
Recognition of the laws of motion and of the inverse-square law of universal gravitation were strongly linked with each other, since motions of planets and comets provide the clearest test for any theory of motion.
An interesting example is the borrowing of Newton's inverse-square law by international trade theorists in economics.