invert

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invert

1. Psychiatry
a. a person who adopts the role of the opposite sex
b. another word for homosexual
2. Architect
a. the lower inner surface of a drain, sewer, etc.
b. an arch that is concave upwards, esp one used in foundations

invert

[′in‚vərt]
(civil engineering)
The floor or bottom of a conduit.

invert

invert
In plumbing, the lowest point or the lowest inside surface of a channel, conduit, drain, pipe, or sewer pipe.
References in periodicals archive ?
22 It is very difficult to deceive plagiarism detecting software, but scholars try to avoid plagiarism check by using some tactics like rephrasing, using synonyms and inverted commas.
Corbett shot man-eaters and not in inverted commas.
Germain examines the role of "Others" in the process, using inverted commas but apparently not in the anthropological sense.
Occasionally they inexplicably go into inverted commas.
Particularly to be commended is the wise and deft way in which Shields shows how homonymy in Aristotle is both a semantic relation (as may be suggested by my repeated use in this review of inverted commas for the sample terms said to be homonymous) and a metaphysical relation (a point that is belied by those same inverted commas).
15: The editors regret that there may have been some ambiguity created due to the use of single inverted commas in two cases in John Hinkson's article 'The Politics of Culture', a response to Nathan Hollier's article, in the same issue, 'The Importance of Class'.
I have put 'catalogue' in inverted commas, because although the Behlings claim it to be nothing more, its quality, in terms of image and the pedigree of its contributors make it more like an exhibition in its own right.
But you simply cannot live your life in inverted commas and expect everybody to get it all the time.
No orthodox Catholic journal should use these terms except with inverted commas.
and a gloss or glosses in inverted commas (with a question mark if uncertain; in cases of sheer ignorance, a question mark takes the place of a gloss).
Most contributors feel compelled to hang the jargon of theoretical discourse in inverted commas since the sacred mystery of language has been abused by the poststructuralists and the authors seek to expose their juvenile daring.
Of particular interest here is his suggestion that Luke is writing for an elite audience and that `the poor' (the inverted commas are his) are really `rhetorical levers, an item of a "symbolic discourse'", that is, not the object of Luke's rhetorical persuasion, even though they are near the centre of his beneficient concern (p.