Invertible Counterpoint

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Invertible Counterpoint

 

a form of polyphonic exposition characterized by a shifting of voices. There are several types of invertible counterpoint. In the vertical type, the higher voice becomes the lower, and in the horizontal type a voice enters earlier or later (in relation to other voices) than in the exposition. Double invertible counterpoint combines the vertical and horizontal types.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Surely the most distinctive characteristic of Sala's partimenti is their exceptional emphasis on imitative and invertible counterpoint, a pedagogical practice van Tour has apdy called "soggetto counterpoint." This is best illustrated by example.
36 [1847]) are quite conventional formally, with first movements in sonata form, lyrical slow movements (with explorations of orchestral color that were consistently singled out in contemporary press reviews), minuet or scherzo with pastoral trio, and exciting finales where the composer's skill at writing invertible counterpoint and fugue find free expression.
One wonders, too - given his harsh words for "formalist" techniques - why he indulges in a four-page digression on the technical intricacies of invertible counterpoint.
These single-line paradigms can be combined in four voices, and these matrixes (which are compared to the structure of the Ursatz) are used to explain all types of invertible counterpoint. Renwick then moves on to the serious sections of fugues, demonstrating that there are a restricted number of possible exposition formats, depending on the category and paradigm of the subject, and that there are a similarly small number of tonal matrixes used in episodes, sequences, and stretto passages.
He premiered many of the piano works of Tchaikovsky, one of his teachers, and was an outstanding interpreter of Ludwig van Beethoven's music; he also taught over 150 pupils, including Rachmaninoff and Alexander Skryabin, and wrote much admired studies on invertible counterpoint and canon that long were at the core of Soviet music education.