Inviolability of the Person

Inviolability of the Person

 

one of the constitutional personal rights and freedoms of citizens. In proclaiming the inviolability of the person, the constitutions of socialist countries specify that no one may be subjected to arrest except in the manner and in cases established by law. Under the Constitution of the USSR (art. 127), a citizen may not be subjected to arrest without a court order or the sanction of a procurator. The inviolability of the person is also proclaimed in the constitutions of the bourgeois states, but in many of these countries it is no protection against arbitrary actions.

References in periodicals archive ?
A According to Penchev the act contradicts current EU law and violates A Bulgaria's Constitution, which stipulates the inviolability of the person and private life.
On the instructions of the President, Foreign Minister Erato Kozakou Marcoullis publicly expressed her "regrets and apologies for the treatment of the ambassador, which was not in conformity with the principle of inviolability of the person and respect of diplomatic representatives".
The inviolability of the person marks a basic tenet of social life, but is not directly relevant here.
His impressive reform agenda, which according to Waldron "promised nothing less than a revolution in Russian society," included proposals to protect the inviolability of the person, to create a peasant small-holder class, to establish a system of universal education, to create worker sickness funds, to place government officials more fully under the rule of law, to reform the local administrative and judicial systems, and to ease restrictions on religious minorities (121).
This line of thinking holds that so long as an act is consensual and respects at least one truth--the inviolability of the persons fundamental right to choose how to use his or her person and property--not only should the law not get involved, but there is also no ground for moral criticism of the act.