inviscid flow


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inviscid flow

[in′vis·əd ′flō]
(fluid mechanics)
Flow of an inviscid fluid. Also known as frictionless flow; ideal flow; nonviscous flow.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The air flow field of a spunbonding attenuator is considered to be a steady and inviscid flow. The flow field is assumed to be two-dimensional.
This method has been demonstrated on a two-dimensional subsonic inviscid flow over a bump with forcing and been successfully used to predict the limit-cycle oscillation behavior over an elastic panel in supersonic flow [26, 27].
Thus, the boundary conditions for the velocity components are essentially the same as in the case of inviscid flow (we need only zero normal velocity at the boundaries).
The assumption of incompressible inviscid flow is made largely for convenience as it considerably simplifies the problem, enabling analytical expressions to be derived.
The acoustic analysis is based on inviscid flow with linear pressure-density relation as
However, it is generally agreed that when employing one-step Arrhenius kinetics, a resolution of at least 20 computational cells per half-reaction length is required in inviscid flow to sufficiently resolve the flow structure and obtain correct results for heat release profile, flame-shock interaction, detonation cell size, and so forth [16-18].
According to Prandtl's boundary layer theory, the effect of viscosity is mainly confined to the boundary layer such that [eta] < [delta], and the outer flow ([eta] > [delta]) could be considered as inviscid flow. From Table 3, the thickness of the boundary layer is just about [delta] [approximately equal to] [delta], where u/[U.sub.[infinity]] = f' [approximately equal to] 0.99.
For higher values of [Re.sub.1], [S.sub.2] - [S.sub.1] has larger values as expected since higher values of the Reynolds number close the case of inviscid flow value given in Table 1.
Equation (11) indicates that the pressure gradient along the y--direction is O([Gr.sup.1/4]) which implies that the lowest order pressure gradient along the x-direction can be determined from the inviscid flow solution.
As with other air exhausts and return openings, the flow near the opening tends to behave as potential or inviscid flow. Thus, the velocity increases monotonically as the flow approaches the openings.
of Memphis) presents thirteen chapters covering fundamental concepts, fluid statics, base equations of fluid mechanics, dimensional analysis and dynamical similitude, flow in closed conduits, flow over immersed bodies, flow in open channels, compressible flow, turbomachinery, measurements in fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations, inviscid flow, and boundary-layer flow.