Invisible architecture

Invisible architecture

A form of architecture that would represent an expenditure of energy to create walls and furniture by the use of jets of air instead of conventional building materials, allowing for instant buildings.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is standing to me how early on Faulkner was invested in dynamically mapping the physical systems of Yoknapatawpha in terms of a complex, but largely invisible architecture. In the opening chapter of <i>Flags in the Dust</i>, for instance, Faulkner presents his first depiction of the plantation house in this context: "Bayard [Sartoris] stood for a while before his house, but the white simplicity of it dreamed unbroken among ancient sunshot trees" (8).
Curator Valerie Smith used Downey's concept of "invisible architecture" (which his notebooks describe as "the understandment [sic] of energy and the manipulation of this wave-material") as a linchpin for the artist's poetic and evolving oeuvre, touching on at least five interrelated phases: late-1960s electronic sculptures; initial explorations with video in the early '70s, resulting in his groundbreaking travelogues Video Trans Americas (1973-76); para-anthropological videos made between 1976 and 1977 in response to periods spent living in the Brazilian Amazon; sustainable architecture and design proposals from this same period; and several series of experimental pedagogical videos, including "The Thinking Eye," 1974-89.
Invisible architecture; experiencing places through the sense of smell.
For all its Art Deco-like lighting fixtures and mint green tiles, this is an oddly invisible architecture. Hooper's technique of panning briefly before resting on a single design feature suggests a searching gaze that finds and then relishes the pervasive decoration that, as we discover via the video, lies hidden everywhere.
His own "invisible architectures" take Fuller's ephemeralization endgame, in fact, as their degree zero.