pressure measurement

(redirected from Ion gauge)

Pressure measurement

The determination of the magnitude of a fluid force applied to a unit area. Pressure measurements are generally classified as gage pressure, absolute pressure, or differential pressure. See Pressure

Pressure gages generally fall in one of three categories, based on the principle of operation: liquid columns, expansible-element gages, and electrical pressure transducers.

Liquid-column gages include barometers and manometers. They consist of a U-shaped tube partly filled with a nonvolatile liquid. Water and mercury are the two most common liquids used in this type of gage. See Barometer, Manometer

There are three classes of expansible metallic-element gages: bourdon, diaphragm, and bellows. Bourdon-spring gages, in which pressure acts on a shaped, flattened, elastic tube, are by far the most widely used type of instrument. These gages are simple, rugged, and inexpensive. In diaphragm-element gages, pressure applied to one or more contoured diaphragm disks acts against a spring or against the spring rate of the diaphragms, producing a measurable motion. In bellows-element gages, pressure in or around the bellows moves the end plate of the bellows against a calibrated spring, producing a measurable motion.

Electrical pressure transducers convert a pressure to an electrical signal which may be used to indicate a pressure or to control a process. Such devices as strain gages and resistive, magnetic, crystal, and capacitive pressure transducers are commonly used to convert the measured pressure to an electrical signal. See Pressure transducer

pressure measurement

[′presh·ər ‚mezh·ər·mənt]
(engineering)
Measurement of the internal forces of a process vessel, tank, or piping caused by pressurized gas or liquid; can be for a static or dynamic pressure, in English or metric units, either absolute (total) or gage (absolute minus atmospheric) pressure.

Pressure measurement

The determination of the magnitude of a fluid force applied to a unit area. Pressure measurements are generally classified as gage pressure, absolute pressure, or differential pressure.

Pressure gages generally fall in one of three categories, based on the principle of operation: liquid columns, expansible-element gages, and electrical pressure transducers.

Liquid-column gages include barometers and manometers. They consist of a U-shaped tube partly filled with a nonvolatile liquid. Water and mercury are the two most common liquids used in this type of gage.

There are three classes of expansible metallic-element gages: bourdon, diaphragm, and bellows. Bourdon-spring gages, in which pressure acts on a shaped, flattened, elastic tube, are by far the most widely used type of instrument. These gages are simple, rugged, and inexpensive. In diaphragm-element gages, pressure applied to one or more contoured diaphragm disks acts against a spring or against the spring rate of the diaphragms, producing a measurable motion. In bellows-element gages, pressure in or around the bellows moves the end plate of the bellows against a calibrated spring, producing a measurable motion.

Electrical pressure transducers convert a pressure to an electrical signal which may be used to indicate a pressure or to control a process. Such devices as strain gages and resistive, magnetic, crystal, and capacitive pressure transducers are commonly used to convert the measured pressure to an electrical signal. See Pressure transducer, Strain gage

References in periodicals archive ?
Or it can simply operate the ion gauge and two convection gauges as individual gauges.
A small air leak can change this makeup, but the total pressure read on a hot or cold cathode ion gauge might show the same reading.
The Mini Ion Gauge Hot Cathode Sensor features a compact, dual filament, Bayard-Alpert type tube that will measure vacuum from [10.
The voltage from an ion gauge controller can be lethal, particularly during electron bombardment degas.
The IGC 100 Ion Gauge Controller monitors pressure from up to two Bayard-Alpert ion gauges, two convection enhanced Pirani gauges and four capacitance manometers.
recently introduced the IGC100, an ion gauge controller with multi-gauge and process automation capabilities.
The GIC-419 ion gauge uses a mini glass ion robe with visible filaments.
The IGC100 ion gauge controller from Stanford Research Systems, Sunnyvale, Calif.
So you should use a Pirani gauge when the application demands better accuracy than a thermocouple gauge provides down to 1 mtorr, especially if the overlap region between the thermocouple and ion gauge you are using is very small.
If helium leak testing with an ion gauge is a common practice in your facility, consider using an all-metal gauge.
The other two are the FullRange Gauge and the IMR 260 Compact Process Ion Gauge.