Iphicrates


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Iphicrates

 

Late fifth century to first half of the fourth century B.C. Athenian military commander of mercenary troops known for his skillful use of peltasts, a medium-armed infantry.

Iphicrates lengthened the spears and swords of the peltastsand created an army that could carry out the missions of light and heavy infantry, that is, use throwing weapons and engage in hand to hand fighting and also move easily and rapidly. He was several times chosen strategos of Athens. Iphicrates won several victories during the Corinthian War (395–387 B.C.). In the 380’s he fought in Thrace on the side of the local ruler Cotys, and in 374–373 he participated in the Persian campaign against Egypt. During the War of the Allies (357–355 B.C.), he was accused of treason but was acquitted. Iphicrates was a typical commander of mercenary units that were increasingly losing touch with thepolis.

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38) And still later, Athens--the archenemy--gave one of its best generals, Iphicrates, on loan to Persia for the recovery of Egypt.
129--146) should also contain two sections on explicit narratorial interventions (which, she argues, have important implications for Xenophon's narrative as a whole): one on Teleutias the Spartan and one on Iphicrates the Athenian in the Hellenica, as well as a section on "Implicit forms of evaluation" employed by secondary narrators; likewise, it is fitting that de Jong's chapter on Herodotus (pp.
Iphicrates Gregor Truter Harlequin Guy Dartnell Trivelin Crispin Redman Euphrosine Amanda Harris Cleanthis Anita Dobson
As the play begins, Iphicrates (Gregor Truter) and Harlequin (Guy Dartnell) are pondering their arrival on the Island of Slaves, joint survivors of a smash at sea.
Not only was it difficult to enter a walled town, but travel on the roads of a hostile state was also risky: in Persia garrisons were placed in forts on the system of royal roads; Iphicrates, a famous Athenian general, sent a false message along the Spartan roads, knowing it would fall into the hands of the guards and be carried to the enemy general; the members of the expedition to seize the Cadmeia (378 B.
In 379 Pharnabazus informed the Athenians that if they did not summon back Chabrias, who was serving as a private mercenary commander for the Egyptian king Achoris against Persia, they risked losing Persia's favour:(7) they recalled their citizen, and further bowed to the demand that they send Iphicrates out to act as a general for the Persian forces.
Dover's second example is Aristotle's attribution to Iphicrates of the following quotation: `My path of words is through the midst of Chares' actions' (1411b1-3).
This case was also known to Aristotle who twice cites remarks of Iphicrates against Harmodius: `what Iphicrates said in the [case] against Harmodius: "If, before accomplishing anything, I asked to be honoured with a statue if I succeeded, you would have granted it.
What complicates the issue is the striking fact that no less than seven further sayings of Iphicrates are quoted in the Rhetoric.
He writes that when Socrates inspired the general Iphicrates by showing him Meidias' fighting-cock, a bystander named Glauconides |saw fit to acquire it for the polis, as if it were a pheasant or peacock'.
Pausanias' account however confuses the escort battalion of hoplites who are wiped out by Iphicrates in Xenophon's account, with the Amyclaeans they had escorted (Hell.
27) Barely two decades after Demosthenes' death, another Athenian general very like him, one Iphicrates, was making his name as a leader of peltasts; and in 367, 12,000 young Athenians flocked to serve under the man who had used peltasts to destroy a Spartan mora (Xen.