Iphigenia

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Iphigenia

(ĭf'əjənī`ə), in Greek legend, daughter of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon. When the Greek ships were delayed by contrary winds at Aulis en route to the Trojan War, Calchas informed Agamemnon that Artemis demanded the sacrifice of his daughter Iphigenia. Agamemnon reluctantly agreed, and, despite Clytemnestra's protestations, Iphigenia nobly consented to die for the glory of Greece. Another legend contends that Artemis saved her life by substituting a hind at the altar and then carried her off to the land of the Taurians to serve as her high priestess. Years later Iphigenia had the opportunity of saving the life of her brother (Orestes), and she escaped with him to Greece. Euripides recounts both legends in his plays Iphigenia in Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris.

Iphigenia

 

in ancient Greek mythology, the daughter of Agamemnon, the king of Mycenae (or Argos). Agamemnon offered Iphigenia as a sacrifice to the goddess Artemis to ensure the safe sailing of the Greek forces headed for Troy. However, the goddess substituted a deer on the altar for the king’s daughter. She transported Iphigenia from Aulis (a harbor in Boeotia) to Tauris (Crimea). In Tauris, Iphigenia served as Artemis’ priestess.

The myth of Iphigenia is the subject of several tragedies, including Euripides’ Iphigenia at Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris, Racine’s Iphigenia, Goethe’s Iphigenia in Tauris, and Haupt-mann’s Iphigenia in Aulis and Iphigenia at Delphi Several operashave been devoted to Iphigenia, for example, Gluck’s Iphigeniain Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris. [11–-155-1]

Iphigenia

rescued at the moment of her sacrificial stabbing. [Gk. Myth.: Gayley, 80–81]
See: Rescue

Iphigenia

slain to appease Artemis’ wrath. [Gk. Myth.: Walsh Classical, 156]
References in periodicals archive ?
Looking closely at the differences between Euripides' text and Lumley's translation, Straznicky contends that Lumley purposely chose to emphasize the father-daughter relationship between Agamemnon and Iphigeneia and that her changes also reveal careful attention to both sound and dramatic coherence, suggesting that the play was intended for performance, possibly to be read in front of Elizabeth I during her visit to Non such Palace.
If in that statement the maids give voice to a central concern of Atwood's about the difficulty of ascertaining the past, the maids may be ventriloquiz-ing, and at the same time satirizing, Atwood the critic of the Odyssey (which she has had to be to write the Penelopiad), as they give a tongue-in-cheek "Anthropology Lecture" in which they discourse on the significance of the number twelve and their status as sacrificial victims--like Iphigeneia.
Lazarus does not rise, Iphigeneia does not live on after her fiery death, nor does the sun stand still in the sky at Joshua's command'.
But Euripides aims at a different effect than does Aischylos in Agamemnon (where Iphigeneia is slaughtered by her father) or Sophokles in Antigone (where Antigone is buried alive by Kreon).
Straznicky convincingly demonstrates that Lumley disregarded many of the traditional early modern translation guidelines to produce a version of Euripides' Iphigeneia ideal for reading aloud by a small group, as designated by her manuscript format.
Colin had already adapted two plays by the classical Greek writer Euripides, Iphigeneia At Aulis and The Bacchai, before embarking on his latest venture.
The play is based on an ancient fragment of text from a missing play by Euripides, which, together with Iphigeneia at Aulis and The Bacchai, completes the trilogy.