Iphigenia

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Iphigenia

(ĭf'əjənī`ə), in Greek legend, daughter of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon. When the Greek ships were delayed by contrary winds at Aulis en route to the Trojan War, Calchas informed Agamemnon that Artemis demanded the sacrifice of his daughter Iphigenia. Agamemnon reluctantly agreed, and, despite Clytemnestra's protestations, Iphigenia nobly consented to die for the glory of Greece. Another legend contends that Artemis saved her life by substituting a hind at the altar and then carried her off to the land of the Taurians to serve as her high priestess. Years later Iphigenia had the opportunity of saving the life of her brother (Orestes), and she escaped with him to Greece. Euripides recounts both legends in his plays Iphigenia in Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Iphigenia

 

in ancient Greek mythology, the daughter of Agamemnon, the king of Mycenae (or Argos). Agamemnon offered Iphigenia as a sacrifice to the goddess Artemis to ensure the safe sailing of the Greek forces headed for Troy. However, the goddess substituted a deer on the altar for the king’s daughter. She transported Iphigenia from Aulis (a harbor in Boeotia) to Tauris (Crimea). In Tauris, Iphigenia served as Artemis’ priestess.

The myth of Iphigenia is the subject of several tragedies, including Euripides’ Iphigenia at Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris, Racine’s Iphigenia, Goethe’s Iphigenia in Tauris, and Haupt-mann’s Iphigenia in Aulis and Iphigenia at Delphi Several operashave been devoted to Iphigenia, for example, Gluck’s Iphigeniain Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris. [11–-155-1]

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Iphigenia

rescued at the moment of her sacrificial stabbing. [Gk. Myth.: Gayley, 80–81]
See: Rescue

Iphigenia

slain to appease Artemis’ wrath. [Gk. Myth.: Walsh Classical, 156]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Having focused on the humanist context and performability of Iphigeneia, Straznicky moves on to explore the idea of private and public readerships for Elizabeth Cary's Tragedy of Mariam.
No fifth-century Greek could sit in the audience and hear that line and not be reminded of the other occasion on which the winds refused to blow for Agamemnon--the story made famous by Aischylos of how Agamemnon came to sacrifice Iphigeneia at the beginning of the Trojan War.
(That of Iphigeneia is perhaps the best known.) This could have been connected to the "spotless" sacrificial offering reported in the Hebrew Scriptures as offering the hope of salvation (126).
They were given the form of serpents when broughttothe stage by Euripides in the Iphigeneia in Tauris: "Dost see her, her the Hades-snake who gapes / To slay me, with dread vipers, open-mouthed?"
Colin had already adapted two plays by the classical Greek writer Euripides, Iphigeneia At Aulis and The Bacchai, before embarking on his latest venture.
The play is based on an ancient fragment of text from a missing play by Euripides, which, together with Iphigeneia at Aulis and The Bacchai, completes the trilogy.
A retelling of the story of the sacrifice of Iphigeneia, King Agamemnon's daughter.
She remains, however, rather put out that Agamemnon sacrificed their daughter Iphigeneia in order to appease the angry goddess Artemis.
Maria has called the stunning creation Iphigeneia (Budding Beauty) and the school hopes it will scoop the EUR3,000 prize money at the Form and Fusion Design Awards at the Green Glens Arena, Millstreet, Co Cork, on Saturday, May 17.
He has been condemned as being a deceiver (Philoctetes), as a man of low morals (Iphigeneia in Aulis), and along with Homer in general as betrayer of reality (Plato); the Romans usually preferred Troy and the Trojans.
Achilles' translation to the White Island after his death is thus in direct contrast to the Odyssey where he ends up leading a rather glum existence in Hades.(15) Wherever we imagine the White Island to be, it certainly sounds better than the Odyssean Hades, and Achilles is described variously in later sources as marrying Helen, Medea, or Iphigeneia.(16) In the Aethiopis, as in the Odyssey, the flames of his funeral pyre are an important symbolic part of his transition into a new location (White Island/Hades).