Iphigenia

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Iphigenia

(ĭf'əjənī`ə), in Greek legend, daughter of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon. When the Greek ships were delayed by contrary winds at Aulis en route to the Trojan War, Calchas informed Agamemnon that Artemis demanded the sacrifice of his daughter Iphigenia. Agamemnon reluctantly agreed, and, despite Clytemnestra's protestations, Iphigenia nobly consented to die for the glory of Greece. Another legend contends that Artemis saved her life by substituting a hind at the altar and then carried her off to the land of the Taurians to serve as her high priestess. Years later Iphigenia had the opportunity of saving the life of her brother (Orestes), and she escaped with him to Greece. Euripides recounts both legends in his plays Iphigenia in Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris.

Iphigenia

 

in ancient Greek mythology, the daughter of Agamemnon, the king of Mycenae (or Argos). Agamemnon offered Iphigenia as a sacrifice to the goddess Artemis to ensure the safe sailing of the Greek forces headed for Troy. However, the goddess substituted a deer on the altar for the king’s daughter. She transported Iphigenia from Aulis (a harbor in Boeotia) to Tauris (Crimea). In Tauris, Iphigenia served as Artemis’ priestess.

The myth of Iphigenia is the subject of several tragedies, including Euripides’ Iphigenia at Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris, Racine’s Iphigenia, Goethe’s Iphigenia in Tauris, and Haupt-mann’s Iphigenia in Aulis and Iphigenia at Delphi Several operashave been devoted to Iphigenia, for example, Gluck’s Iphigeniain Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris. [11–-155-1]

Iphigenia

rescued at the moment of her sacrificial stabbing. [Gk. Myth.: Gayley, 80–81]
See: Rescue

Iphigenia

slain to appease Artemis’ wrath. [Gk. Myth.: Walsh Classical, 156]
References in periodicals archive ?
Having focused on the humanist context and performability of Iphigeneia, Straznicky moves on to explore the idea of private and public readerships for Elizabeth Cary's Tragedy of Mariam.
No fifth-century Greek could sit in the audience and hear that line and not be reminded of the other occasion on which the winds refused to blow for Agamemnon--the story made famous by Aischylos of how Agamemnon came to sacrifice Iphigeneia at the beginning of the Trojan War.
He recalls: "When I did The Bacchai for the National I was having lunch with Edith Hall, professor of classics at Durham, who was offering background advice, and she pointed out that there was a missing play between The Bacchai and Iphigeneia, which I didn't know about.
Although Sidney's and Cary's plays have already appeared in excellent separate scholarly editions and are available in the theatre-oriented anthology Renaissance Drama by Women: Texts and Documents (London, 1996), this volume is the first to treat them, together with Lumley's Iphigeneia, as plays belonging to literary and social traditions that are fundamentally unrelated to the early modern professional theatre.
The author mentions the plays Iphigeneia in Tauride, Proserpina, Prometheus, and the epic Achilles' Poem.
15) Wherever we imagine the White Island to be, it certainly sounds better than the Odyssean Hades, and Achilles is described variously in later sources as marrying Helen, Medea, or Iphigeneia.
He suffered as Orestes the forgive suffered from his mother's Furies (until purified by his sister Iphigeneia, priestess of Taurian Artemis), and his mind was no less disturbed that that of Pentheus king of Thebes, when Bacchus drove him mad, or than his mother Agave, when she came to her senses and found that she had tom him in pieces.
The major ancient sources for the Achilles story are, in rough order of importance, the Iliad, the Odyssey, Euripides' Iphigeneia in Aulis, the Chrestomatheia of Proclus, and Ovid's Metamorphosis.
One thinks of Iphigeneia in Tauris and Ion as examples of this trend.
By Clytemnestra, Agamemnon has a son, Orestes, and three daughters, Iphigeneia (Iphianassa), Electra (Laodice), and Chrysothemis.
14, prefers tragedies which end well on the model of Euripides' Iphigeneia in Tauris over those which end badly on the model of Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, and which he had regarded in ch.
Phoenissae and La Thebaide; Andromache and Andromaque; Iphigeneia in Aulis and Iphigenie; Hippolytos and Phedre.