Iphigenia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Iphigenia

(ĭf'əjənī`ə), in Greek legend, daughter of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon. When the Greek ships were delayed by contrary winds at Aulis en route to the Trojan War, Calchas informed Agamemnon that Artemis demanded the sacrifice of his daughter Iphigenia. Agamemnon reluctantly agreed, and, despite Clytemnestra's protestations, Iphigenia nobly consented to die for the glory of Greece. Another legend contends that Artemis saved her life by substituting a hind at the altar and then carried her off to the land of the Taurians to serve as her high priestess. Years later Iphigenia had the opportunity of saving the life of her brother (Orestes), and she escaped with him to Greece. Euripides recounts both legends in his plays Iphigenia in Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris.

Iphigenia

 

in ancient Greek mythology, the daughter of Agamemnon, the king of Mycenae (or Argos). Agamemnon offered Iphigenia as a sacrifice to the goddess Artemis to ensure the safe sailing of the Greek forces headed for Troy. However, the goddess substituted a deer on the altar for the king’s daughter. She transported Iphigenia from Aulis (a harbor in Boeotia) to Tauris (Crimea). In Tauris, Iphigenia served as Artemis’ priestess.

The myth of Iphigenia is the subject of several tragedies, including Euripides’ Iphigenia at Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris, Racine’s Iphigenia, Goethe’s Iphigenia in Tauris, and Haupt-mann’s Iphigenia in Aulis and Iphigenia at Delphi Several operashave been devoted to Iphigenia, for example, Gluck’s Iphigeniain Aulis and Iphigenia in Tauris. [11–-155-1]

Iphigenia

rescued at the moment of her sacrificial stabbing. [Gk. Myth.: Gayley, 80–81]
See: Rescue

Iphigenia

slain to appease Artemis’ wrath. [Gk. Myth.: Walsh Classical, 156]
References in periodicals archive ?
Together with these audience members -- and accompanied by live music -- a six-member chorus will narrate the tragic story of Iphigenia.
Achilles, the greatest hero of the Greeks, a demigod, learns that Iphigenia has been tricked into coming to the camp under the pretense that she is supposed to marry him.
allusions to Iphigenia in Tauris below, of which there are many, but at
Euripides's Iphigenia among the Taurians therefore serves as an instructive analogue for the sacrificial transgression of the human/animal boundary in Electra.
Alison Findlay's discussion of Lady Jane Lumley's Iphigenia in Aulis certainly demonstrates the advantages of combining traditional scholarship and performance studies approaches.
The Chorus of the Iphigenia at Aulis moves from praising the possession of Aphrodite in moderation (543-5) to women's virtue, which is chastity (569), to Paris and Helen and the look that he gave her, which stirred up her desire (584-5).
Robert Carsen's production of Iphigenia, and Susan Graham in the title role, also brought mostly kudos.
Erasmus's Iphigenia and Hecuba translations (1506) provide a touchstone for examining Buchanan's style, inclusion of political and Biblical allusions, and what Jean-Frederic Chevalier terms a "poetics of borrowing," while remaining controversial as well as renowned.
Iphigenia (127m/1977), The Cherry Orchard (141m/1999) and Sweet Country (143m/1987).
Our director for Burial at Thebes, Marcela Lorca, asked me to write music for a BFA project at the University of Minnesota called Iphigenia at Aulis and out of that grew our collaboration for Burial at Thebes.
Iphigenia in Forest Hills--Anatomy of a Murder Trial By Janet Malcolm
Iphigenia recognizes that she must work out the will of the gods ethically, and that divine will cannot contradict human reason.