Iphis


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Iphis

Cretan maiden reared as boy because father ordered all daughters killed. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 143]
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The cast is exceptional: countertenor Tim Mead (Hamor) is not just impressive and an extraordinary virtuoso, but makes us feel his noble and sincere love for Iphis, sung with a pure and innocent timbre by Katherine Watson.
In order to assess the statistical properties of each disease and assess seasonal trends, historical data were obtained from either iPHIS or PHOL.
Her desire for Paris suggests that she wants to stage Iphis and Anaxarete so that she can cast him in a more easily sexualized role, "a lover's part" The performance then is pornographic: the object of the performance is Domitia and the purpose is to inflame her desire.
Soprano Fflur Wyn as Iphis in the WNO''s production of Jephtha
In the past ten years, scholars have investigated primarily what the Iphis story itself can tell us about Ovidian/Roman concepts of gender and sexuality; (5) these enquiries have yielded a number of different, but often complementary, interpretations.
As Christine cites the Ovidian tales, she reminds her readers that a text or tale can embody several simultaneous (often conflicting) meanings, just as the bodies of Ulysses' men, Tiresias, Iphis, Fortune, as well as her own body, can contain many different realities and occasion many different interpretations.
For me, however, it was Fflur Wyn as the daughter Iphis who stole the honours last night, her voice quite beautiful and her role an extremely moving one as she prepares for death.
There is indeed a parallel here with the Latin poem, according to which the girl Iphis was from birth disguised as a boy.
([section]) Coefficients of parentage estimated with International Phaseulus Information System (IPHIS) software.
9,770-797), Isis brings about the marriage of two young girls, Iphis and Ianthe, by miraculously turning one of them into a young man, while she is attributed with reuniting the separated husband and wife in Xenophon of Ephesus' Ephesiaka (5,13).
For instance, John Lyly's Gallathea, based on the story of Iphis and Ianthe in Ovid's Metamorphoses, raises issues different from the conflict between male homoeroticism and marital heterosexuality charted in his chapter on Ovidian comedy.