Ipiutak


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Ipiutak

 

an ancient Eskimo culture of walrus, seal, and caribou hunters that dates from the first half of the first millennium A.D. It was investigated by American and Danish archaeologists in 1939–41 on Point Hope, Alaska. Approximately 700 semisub-terranean quadrangular wooden dwellings with hearths were discovered along with approximately 140 burials, some in wooden coffins, with masks on the skulls and eyes made of ivory and jet inserted in the orbits. Flaked stone implements, articles made of bone and antler (arrowheads, toggle-harpoon heads, needles), decorated animal figurines, and carvings in ivory were also found.

REFERENCES

Larsen, H., and Fr. Rainey. “Ipiutak and the Arctic Whale Hunting Culture.” Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History, 1948, VOL. 42.
Giddings, J. L. Ancient Men of the Arctic. London, 1968.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ipiutak are culturally distinct from the western Thule, who were whale hunters that are more clearly ancestors of the modern Inupiaq.
Ipiutak hunted seals and smaller mammals on the coast but don't seem to have hunted whale.
How the Ipiutak would have sustained a village of hundreds on the resources of the area, without evidence of whaling, is a puzzle to historians and archeologists, as is where the Ipiutak went.