ironwork

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ironwork

1. work done in iron, esp decorative work
2. the craft or practice of working in iron

Ironwork

Objects made of cast iron or wrought iron; most often with utilitarian form in colonial America, but thereafter elaborate and ornamental.

ironwork

Objects or parts of objects made of cast iron or wrought iron; initially utilitarian, later often elaborate and ornamental; Also see cast-iron lacework.
References in periodicals archive ?
P&GJ: What's your advice for others out there interested in getting into the welding or ironworking field?
From this overview it remains unclear as to when the Israelites became skilled in ironworking.
Ironworking was a demanding trade, requiring years of training, so most of the original workers were brought from England, which introduced some challenges for the community.
Across Illinois, in places where unions thrive, construction industry professionals and career and technical education (CTE) teachers of building trades promote similar initiatives to lure students such as DiDomenico into fields that include carpentry, electrical work and ironworking.
Any interested in ironworking art will find it a fine acquisition.
The biggest thrill in ironworking is when you're getting up 13, 14, 15 floors and you're standing on an 8-inch, 10-inch beam.
Bronze- and Ironworking in the Area of the Athenian Agora," Hesperia 46, pp.
Raybould's purpose was to examine the economic role of the estate over more than a century according to several categories--coal and other minerals, ironworking, transport and agriculture--not the developer himself.
Ironworking remains are also seen as important so close to the birthplace of the later Industrial Revolution.
It is natural to expect a generation brought up on SOM, Kipnis and herbal tea to be confounded by these creatures creeping out of valleys with a thousand years of ironworking, wood crafting, leather thong honing mixed in with stories from professors who do sensitive or quirky buildings.
The dam is a relic of Bellingham's ironworking past.
The town of Tintern, a half mile from the Abbey, was an ironworking village of some note, and in 1798 with the war at full tilt, the works were unusually active.