Iroquoian


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Related to Iroquoian: Iroquoian language, Muskogean

Iroquoian

(ĭr'əkwoi`ən), branch of Native North American languages belonging to the Hokan-Siouan linguistic family, or stock, of North and Central America. See Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The volume grew out of a session at the 2011 Society of American Archaeology meeting in Sacramento called to improve communication between US and Canadian archaeologists working on Northern Iroquoian societies.
Such cosmologically inspired designs have a long tradition in Iroquoian art.
Exhibited works include Iroquoian style pots dug up in Colchester Vermont from the 1400s and 1500s, a collection of stone tools and ancient arrowheads, as well as covered woven baskets by the Abenaki made from ash and sweetgrass.
Mann, author of Iroquoian Women: The Gantowisas, has documented the way some observers, and scholars who came after them, ignored clear evidence of unusual female agency--partly because their patriarchal assumptions meant they simply could not believe what they saw.
Among the Cherokees and other Iroquoian peoples, it was important to give each person an opportunity to express themselves at such meetings.
Along with caring for rapidly growing ethnological collections housed in the Survey-affiliated Victoria Memorial Museum, Waugh continued with Iroquoian research through the 1915 field season.
For instance, the Algonquin and Iroquoian peoples of the great Eastern forests created a homeland of meadows, vineyards, fruit and nut trees and massive amounts of wildlife with the use of fire.
Extensive archaeological surveys across southern Simcoe County have revealed clusters of middle Iroquoian sites.
The Rotinonshonni; a traditional Iroquoian history through the eyes of Teharonhia:wako and Sawiskera.
Atoca' or 'Ataca' in the Iroquoian languages, a designation commonly used in the province of Quebec, Canada) is the American name for an Ericaceous plant domesticated in North America since the beginning of the 19th century, and since 1939 in Quebec, Canada.
Borrowing an idea from the Iroquoian and Algonquin peoples, we call these pines the Standing Ones; they connect earth to sky and hold the memories of the cycle of countless seasons.