food irradiation

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food irradiation

[′füd i‚rā·dē¦ā·shən]
(food engineering)
The treatment of fresh or processed foods with ionizing radiation that inactivates biological contaminants (insects, molds, parasites, or bacteria), rendering foods safe to consume and extending their storage lifetime.
References in periodicals archive ?
Currently, 50 countries accept irradiated food products, including the world's biggest farm product importers.
These variances often result in confusions in the worldwide trade of irradiated foods and hence a reliable and authentic method to identify irradiated products is required all the times [8, 9].
Overall, the Japanese government has been harshly criticised for acting too late; for denying the dangers emitting from irradiated food; and for their weak attitude towards testing during the last year (Foodwatch, 2011).
Aside from concerns about irradiated food, we need to consider the process itself, which is a high energy user and has environmental hazards.
He was speaking at the SIAL 2010 Irradiation Seminar yesterday, in which international radiation experts met with food security and nuclear safety officials to discuss the benefits and hazards of irradiated food.
Availability of detection methods for irradiated foods would improve standard regulatory procedures.
Current regulations require that irradiated food bear the Radura symbol, either at the individual unit level or at point of sale.
He also went on to fund a university research project into irradiated food.
It is important to say that irradiated food is not radioactive and will not glow in the dark.
Iowa State's Olson says all safety research was completed by the 1980s and "while there is still some continuing work, nothing [negative] has been shown on a consistent basis." In fact, astronauts have been eating irradiated food since the 1970s, increasing its respectability.
"The long-term effects of irradiation are still unknown, and irradiation is not a panacea, to food safety concerns." Iowa State's Olson says all safety research was completed by the 1980s and "while there is still some continuing work, nothing [negative] has been shown on a consistent basis." In fact, astronauts have been eating irradiated food since the 1970s, increasing its respectability.
Not only that, they are also working on changing the labels on irradiated food so that irradiated food need not be identified as such, instead being mislabeled "pasteurized!" In other words, the FDA knows that the public objects to irradiated foods, and doesn't want to have to face irate consumers over that issue!