contact dermatitis

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contact dermatitis

[′kän‚takt dər·mə′tīd·əs]
(medicine)
An acute or chronic inflammation of the skin resulting from irritation by or sensitization to some substance coming in contact with the skin.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The vulvar itching and irritation that occur with DIV most likely represent an irritant contact dermatitis, with vaginal secretions serving as the irritant.
Maibach, "Occupational issues of irritant contact dermatitis," International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, vol.
Irritant contact dermatitis is a non-specific inflammatory dermatosis, mainly due to the toxicity of chemicals on the skin cells.
Some patients have developed a form of irritant contact dermatitis, normally seen in healthcare workers who repeatedly use alcohol hand gels in clinical environments.
In Irritant Contact Dermatitis skin is damaged by frequent washing and wearing of latex gloves and may become reddened, dry and itchy.
Randy Wickett of the University of Cincinnati explained how those with genotype AA/GA appear to be more prone to intense neurosensory response, more prone to develop irritant contact dermatitis as a result of repeated hand hygiene and less responsive to lotion treatment.
[4] reported on approximately 12,000 laboratory workers, in whom there were 83 cases of occupational dermatitis which included 31, 20 and 18 cases of allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis and contact urticaria, respectively.
Mr Berlin pointed out that the dust is 'potentially very hazardous and toxic,' and when damp an alkaline solution is formed which can cause burning and ulceration to skin and eyes, as well as irritant contact dermatitis.
-- Substantial or even minor trauma to the skin may precipitate irritant contact dermatitis in patients, especially after surgery or exposure to occupational hazards, James S.
-- Despite the widespread use of topical corticosteroids for irritant contact dermatitis, there is little evidence that they work any better than moisturizers, and they may make the dermatitis worse, Howard I.