Isobaric Surfaces

Isobaric Surfaces

 

surfaces of equal air pressure in the atmosphere.

The relative location of isobaric surfaces gives an idea of the spatial distribution of air pressure. In a cyclone (that is, an area of reduced pressure) an isobaric surface is a concave surface and in an anticyclone (that is, an area of increased pressure) it is convex. The slope of isobaric surfaces determines wind speed: the greater the slope of the isobaric surfaces, the greater the wind speed, all other conditions being equal. The intersection of isobaric surfaces with a horizontal plane (at sea level and other level surfaces) produces isobars.

References in periodicals archive ?
The effect is due to the deformation of Acadian isothermal and isobaric surfaces by the antiform al cross-fold, and does not represent a true syn-metamorphic inversion.
If it is zero, there is compensation between the Coriolis force, 2W sinF, and the inclination of the isobaric surfaces (those acted upon by the same pressure) transversely to the current, an angle expressed as dD/dx.
The isobaric surfaces show a (geopotential) topography or relief that does not coincide with that of the Earth.