Isobaric Surfaces

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Isobaric Surfaces

 

surfaces of equal air pressure in the atmosphere.

The relative location of isobaric surfaces gives an idea of the spatial distribution of air pressure. In a cyclone (that is, an area of reduced pressure) an isobaric surface is a concave surface and in an anticyclone (that is, an area of increased pressure) it is convex. The slope of isobaric surfaces determines wind speed: the greater the slope of the isobaric surfaces, the greater the wind speed, all other conditions being equal. The intersection of isobaric surfaces with a horizontal plane (at sea level and other level surfaces) produces isobars.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The isobaric surfaces above the inlet leading edge and that under the cowl lip are due to the wall thickness which leads to additional external shocks.
Shock reflections inside the inlet are quite obvious, as illustrated by the isobaric surfaces of p/[p.sub.0] = 3.7.
The surface wall is contoured by the pressure ratio p/[p.sub.0], whereas the three isobaric surfaces, respectively, p/[p.sub.0] = 2.4, 8, and 23, are contoured by the Mach number.
The effect is due to the deformation of Acadian isothermal and isobaric surfaces by the antiform al cross-fold, and does not represent a true syn-metamorphic inversion.
The isobaric surfaces show a (geopotential) topography or relief that does not coincide with that of the Earth.
9 Although we usually measure height on land against sea-level, the sea is not in fact strictly flat, but has its own topography that is generally measured in terms of the difference in height and the isobaric surface at a specific reference pressure.