isoflavone

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Related to Isoflavones: Soy isoflavones

isoflavone

[¦ī·sō′fla‚vōn]
(biochemistry)
C15H10O2 A colorless, crystalline ketone, occurring in many plants, generally in the form of a hydroxy derivative.
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of soy isoflavones and peptides to reduce microbial contamination could benefit food processors who often use synthetic additives to protect foods.
12) The isolated soy protein (ISP) containing 68 mg/d (aglycone equivalents) soy isoflavones was provided as a daily food supplement comprising of a powder, that could be made into a drink or sprinkled over food, and a snack bar.
Soy isoflavones are naturally occurring, plant-based estrogens found in the soybean plant.
By contrast, Western diets mainly comprise red meat-based foods with bare isoflavones.
To test the theory, 200 women in early menopause were either given a daily supplement containing soy protein with 66 milligrams of isoflavones, or one only containing soy protein for six months.
Methods In this randomized pretest-posttest control group design, 25 patients were randomized into 5 groups: isoflavones 40 mg, 80 mg, 120 mg, 160 mg and placebo, and treated for 4 weeks.
The investigators used a standardized soy isoflavone supplement for comparison in the study because of the scientific consensus that extracts or concentrated soy isoflavones support relief of hot flashes in menopausal women, based on placebo-controlled studies.
The soybean grains contain basically four different forms of isoflavones which are: glycosides (daidzin, genistin and glycitin) acetyl glycosides (acetyl-daidzin, acetyl-genistin and acetyl-glycitin), malonyl glycosides (malonyl-daidzin, malonyl-genistin and malonyl-glycitin) and the unconjugated structural form of aglycone (daidzein, genistein and glycitein).
After two years, those who took the isoflavones had no higher spine or hip bone density than those who took the placebo.
Genistein, daidzein and glycitein are soy's primary isoflavones and, as a result of their structure, which is similar to that of oestrogen, they bind weakly to the hormone's receptors in skin, bones and blood vessels, where research shows they lessen the same menopause symptoms.
Soybeans and foods made from soy are the major source of isoflavones, which serve as antioxidants, scavenging and neutralizing free radicals that might otherwise cause inflammation and increase the risk of heart disease.
Of these, the soy isoflavones have received considerable attention for development as dietary supplements for post-menopausal women due to absence of adverse effect profile of HRT.