Isolated Topographic Feature

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Isolated Topographic Feature

 

(Russian, urochi-shche), in physical geography, one of the morphological parts of a geographic landscape; an interconnected system of landscape facies. Isolated topographic features usually occur on some relief form that is uniform in origin and age and is either convex or concave in shape. The features normally lie on a homogeneous substratum and are unified by a common trend in the physicogeo-graphic processes. Three examples of isolated topographic features are a morainic hill, a solonchak depression, and a watershed marsh. In an extended sense, the term “isolated topographic feature” may refer to any part of a landscape that differs from the rest, such as a wood in the middle of a field.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.