isometric contraction


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Related to isometric contraction: isometric muscle contraction

isometric contraction

[¦ī·sə′me·trik kən′trak·shən]
(physiology)
A contraction in which muscle tension is increased, but the muscle is not shortened because the resistance cannot be overcome. Also known as static contraction.
References in periodicals archive ?
EMG, reflux and reaction time components, muscle structure, and fatigue during intermittent isometric contractions in man.
During maximum isometric contractions in flexion and extension of the wrist (Figure 2), the strength signals were collected using a strength gauge (NTEP-87-057A3 class III, Artech, Riverside, CA).
The effect of maximal isometric contraction training in various knee positions on physical capacity of Healthy Quadriceps Muscle" Sports Med J 2006;8:464-469.
Clinicians can confidently use ultrasound to measure muscle activation during low levels of isometric contraction of transversus abdominis, internal oblique, external oblique, and lumbar multifidus.
Gender differences in back extensor endurance capacity during isometric contraction in this study could not be linked to age influence as the participants were age matched.
Isometric contraction occurs when muscles are loaded while stationary (e.
The most commonly used PNF technique is called stretch- contract-relax, where the muscle compartment is taken to the point of stretch for 10-15 seconds, followed by an isometric contraction (provided by a partner) for 3-5 seconds, followed by 3-5 second relax period.
Isometric contraction in which pushing with the strong arm and pulling with the weak arm offset recoil.
Resistance equal to that of the patient is an isometric contraction and increases tension in the agonist muscle but without movement; this is associated with increased strength or tone of this muscle.
Once the change in grip force can be predicted, so too can the fatigue that develops during either a single, sustained isometric contraction or a repeated sequence of such contractions.
Muscular endurance can be measured using isometric, isokinetic, or isotonic contractions by directing subjects to sustain an isometric contraction as long as possible at a force corresponding to a specified percentage of isometric strength, by performing isokinetic contractions at a set cadence until torque decreases to a specified percentage or maximum, or by performing the maximum number of isotonic contractions against a resistance set at a specified percentage of the 1-RM.
The study revealed that the Shake Weight[TM] radically outperforms free weights due to the rapid motion of the exercise and isometric contraction of the entire upper body during use.