Isonzo

Isonzo

(ēzôn`tsō), river, 87 mi (140 km) long, rising in the Julian Alps, NW Slovenia, and flowing S through Slovenia, where it is known as the Soča, then SW through NE Italy before emptying into the Gulf of Trieste. At the entrance to the Venetian plain, the Isonzo valley was the scene of many battles during World Wars I and II. After World War II, the part of the valley above Gorizia, Italy, was given to the former Yugoslavia.

Isonzo

 

(in Slovene, Soča), a river in Yugoslavia and Italy. Length, 136 km; basin area, about 3,500 sq km. Rises in the Julian Alps in Yugoslavia. It crosses the Italian-Yugoslav border near Gorizia, flows out onto the Friulian Plain, and empties into the Gulf of Trieste in the Adriatic. The river is fed by snow and rain. High water is in the spring and autumn; low water is in the summer and winter. The average water discharge is 135 m3/sec. There are several hydroelectric power plants along the Isonzo. In its lower course the river is navigable.

During World War I (1914–18) there were fierce battles on the Isonzo between the Italian and Austrian and German forces (1915–17). The river was the site of the so-called 11 battles on the Isonzo, in which the Italians failed to penetrate the enemy’s defenses.

References in periodicals archive ?
A Farewell to Arms begins "[i]n the late summer of" 1915 (FTA 3), placing the novel's opening during or soon after the Second Battle of the Isonzo (17 July - 10 August), which resulted in 42,000 Italian fatalities (Massignani).
The book is organized into twelve chapters, each of which focuses on a battle or campaign (Gallipoli, Verdun, Isonzo, Jutland, and the Somme); a country (Ireland, USA, and Russia); or a larger area (Eastern Front, Asia, Africa, Eastern Mediterranean, and the Balkans).
Pope Francis would not be the pontiff had his grandfather, Giovanni Bergoglio, perished when he fought in World War I in a bloody campaign along the Isonzo River, near the graveyard where the pontiff visited.
From humble beginnings - he inherited just five hectares of vines - he now owns the largest vineyard in Isonzo, the wine region in which Pieris is set, with over 150 hectares of vines on two prime sites.
During September/October 1917 the Regiment spent some weeks on the notorious Isonzo front before returning to South Tyrol.
Sauvignon Isonzo del Friuli DOC 1998 (pounds 4.49): Delicately fragrant and zesty Sauvignon.
One of the most notable is Miracle at Verdun (1931) by Austrian writer Hans Chlumberg, who fought in Italy, including the last battle of the Isonzo. The idea of the play occurred to him suddenly in the form of a question: "What if the soldiers who died in the World War were to rise from their graves and return to the world they died to redeem?" The play begins at a military cemetery in the Argonne Forest composed of a large burial ground of crosses--so many they "continue out of sight." In the center of the cemetery resides a mass grave of both French and German dead, identified by a stone cross rising to the height of an average man.
Quattrocchio, Via Isonzo 51, 15100 Alessandria, Italy +39 131 445361 23
Born in Piedmont (September 28, 1871); commissioned in the artillery (1890), he first saw action in the Italo-Ethiopian War (1895-1896); survived the disaster of Adowa (March 1, 1896); served in the Italo-Turkish War in Libya (1911-1912); involved in the Isonzo battles (1915-1917), he first served as chief of staff for the 2d Army; later, as commander of II Corps, he gained distinction for the capture of Monte Sabotin (near Gorizia) (August 6, 1916); still in command of II Corps during the battle of Caporetto (October 24-November 12, 1917), he extracted his forces with difficulty; appointed chief of staff to Gen.
Principal battles: Isonzo River (1915); Trentino (1916); Piave River (1918).
Principal battles: Zamosc-Komarow (1914); Gorlice-Tarnow (1915); Isonzo I-Isonzo XI (1915-1917); Caporetto (Kobarid) (1917); Piave River, Vittorio Veneto (1918).