isopycnic

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isopycnic

[¦ī·sō¦pik·nik]
(meteorology)
A line on a chart connecting all points of equal or constant density.
(physics)
Of equal or constant density, with respect to either space or time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, we must assume the existence of some horizontal Rn supplies, possibly by isopycnal eddy diffusion, from the inside walls of the trench over the water column up to 2692 m above the bottom.
where [eta] denotes the deviation of the isopycnal surface from its undisturbed location (measured at a depth that corresponds to the maximum of the vertical mode), c is the phase speed of long internal waves, [alpha] is the coefficient at the quadratic term (often called the quadratic nonlinearity coefficient), [[alpha].
If this condition is applied, the function [eta](x,t) describes deviations of the isopycnal surface from its undisturbed position at the location z = [z.
Isopycnal models, often referred to as layered models, divide the water column into constant density layers as shown in Fig.
1982: Oceanic isopycnal mixing by coordinate rotation.
The Walsh and Carmack (2003) conceptual model of double-diffusive driving of intrusions is distinct from other studies (Smith and Ferrari 2010) that have identified isopycnal stirring by submesoscale eddies as a production mechanism for intrusions.
Within the strongly stratified ocean interior, a clear distinction can be made between isopycnal processes, which act along surfaces of constant potential density (or, more strictly, neutral surfaces; Montgomery 1940; McDougall 1984), and diapycnal processes, which act across these surfaces (Gregg 1987; MacKinnon et al.
Between 2005 and 2014, storage increased dramatically along P16S north of 55[degrees]S following isopycnal surfaces where recently formed mode and intermediate water masses moved into the ocean interior.
Sea water tends to move horizontally along isopycnals (surfaces of equal density).
In the subsurface, fresher subpolar waters slide along isopycnals to intermediate depths, underneath saltier subtropical waters, which are in turn capped at low latitudes by fresher tropical waters (e.