stable isotope

(redirected from Isotopic fractionation)
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stable isotope

[′stā·bəl ′ī·sə‚tōp]
(nuclear physics)
An isotope which does not spontaneously undergo radioactive decay.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 5: Temporal variations in the apparent carbon isotopic fractionation factor, [alpha], between C[O.sub.2] and C[H.sub.4].
(2) Because there is very little isotopic fractionation of carbon during trophic transfer (DeNiro and Epstein 1978, Fry and Sherr 1989), and because the increase in [Delta]15N with trophic transfer is relatively constant (between 3.0 and 5.0%, Minigawa and Wada 1984, Hesslein et al.
TSR around the oil-water transition zone may have not consumed all the dissolved S[O.sub.4.sup.2-]; [sup.34]S[O.sub.4.sup.2-] may have been reduced preferentially as the result of kinetic isotopic fractionation; thus, significant [[delta].sup.34][S.sub.SO4-H2S] differences are observed.
Once the C is fixed into plant tissue, the isotopic fractionation is preserved.
During water evaporation, the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopic fractionation mainly includes two parts, namely, dynamic fractionation and balance fractionation.
Another premise is the knowledge of isotopic fractionation that occurs due to the accumulation of heavier isotope atoms in the tissues of the consumer organism (Fry, 2006).
5), may result from changes in environmentally induced conodont metabolism, the trophic level of feeding, or isotopic fractionation at the base of the food web (phytoplankton) that is transferred through the food web.
Through a process called isotopic fractionation, hydrogen was pulled towards the young Earth's center.
Given the wide range of factors influencing human diet, mobility, and physiology, studies with non-human animal models, which can identify mechanisms of isotopic fractionation (and distribution/uptake) more precisely under different conditions, must precede applications of novel methods to archaeological skeletal material.
Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic fractionation between diet and tissue of captive red fox: implications for dietary reconstruction.--Can.
The most likely explanation of this isotopic fractionation is the active uptake of heavy metals by siderophilic root exudates.