Israfel


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Israfel

“none sing so wildly well.” [Am. Lit.: “Israfel” in Portable Poe, 606]
See: Music
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where was it i once saw a dogwood tree not white but tan tan as cream what will you say to her bitter and new as a sunburned flame bitter and new those two little silken snails somewhere under her dress horned pinkly yet reluctant o israfel ay wax your wings with the thin odorless moisture of her thighs strangle your heart with hair fool fool cursed and forgotten of god.
In symbolic terms this contrast pits Muhammad, the Oriental figure, who, like Israfel, represents imaginative excellence, against Metzengerstein, who abandons his inheritance and devotes himself to crushing 'the Orient' in the person of Berlifitzing.
Moreover, the parody also takes many stabs at academic egocentrism, authorial control, and cryptic analyses manifested by the story's imaginary Israfel Society, dedicated solely to the serious study and often convoluted interpretation of Poe's fiction.
Charlotte Purkis, a scholar of dance and performance arts across cultures, earns my personal thanks for introducing me to another critic, one who wrote as Israfel Mondego, in her "'You Might Have Called It Beauty or Poetry or Passion Just As Well As Music': Gertrude Hudson's Fictional Fantasias." Hudson also revealed a "drive towards a performative kind of writing" as her quasi-fictional commentaries on music in Impossibilities: Fantasias (1897) and later writings showed.
(18) Hervey Allen, Israfel: The Life and Times of Edgar Allan Poe (New York: Farrar and Rinehart, 1934), p.
of Hervey Allen's Israfel in 1927 would have led him back to
Allen refers to "Maelstrom" (for airplane roar), "Amontillado" (for bomb shelters), "Masque of the Red Death" (for industrial atmospheric pollution), and finally to the misconception (derived from Hervey Allen's 1926 biography Israfel), that Poe died from being "cooped" or drugged, then repeatedly set to voting in Baltimore's 1849 polls.
At line 76, struggling out of this sordidness, the poet/Alexander climbs to the top of the mountain at the end of the world and sees Israfel, the archangel, readying his trumpet to announce the end of time.
That same year his authoritative biography Israfel: The Life and Times of Edgar Allan Poe was published.