Ithamore

Ithamore

purchased by Barabas to betray Governor of Malta. [Br. Drama: The Jew of Malta]
See: Servant
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References in periodicals archive ?
In his attempts to befriend Ithamore and Femeze, Barabas violates not only Classical but also Machiavellian criteria for friendship.
Lanre Malaolu's wickedly gullible Ithamore is a splendid foil to Barabas' destructive plans in director Justin Audibert's exciting debut RSC production.
gt;Charlie Beautiful Clearly, this is a manic roundabout of murder, fornication and moral mayhem as Barabas buys the slave Ithamore (the dazzlingly clever Lanre Malaolu) to aid and abet his wicked schemes, bundles his daughter into a Christian convent and then poisons all the nuns, including his daughter ( Catrin Stewart as Abigail) with a deadly porridge and eventually attains the title of governor with the help of the very people who took away his levied capital in stage one of the evening.
Lanre Malaolu, too, gives an energetic performance as Ithamore, employed as Barabas' Moorish slave and accomplice, who hates the Christians as much as he does.
While not based on a particular real-life counterpart, Marlowe's Bellamira's seduction of Ithamore, according to Salkeld, alludes topically to the growing presence of black servants in contemporary London.
And, on a question of detail, he claims that in The Jew of Malta Barabas fails to poison Ithamore and his confederates despite their deaths being announced in the following scene.
Eleazar and Othello [became] the defining literary representation of the "Moor," and Bajazeth, Ithamore and Amureth of the "Turk"'.
Having just poisoned a whole nunnery in the Jew of Malta, Ithamore muses about keeping the killing a secret, assuring his master, "For my part fear you not.
In particular, figures such as Calymath and Ithamore in The Jew of Malta, developed the concept of the Eastern intruder in Western lands.
When Ithamore (The Jew of Malta) says 'Look how his brains drop out on's nose', the author adds compassionately, 'Let us hope that this macabre detail does not reflect Marlowe's personal experience'.
Both Barabas and Ithamore represent a new class of intelligent agents "shuttling back and forth between two sides," while remaining loyal only to themselves, perhaps a trademark of Renaissance espionage.