Itzik Fefer

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fefer, Itzik

 

(Isaak Solomonovich Fefer). Born Sept. 10 (23), 1900; died 1952. Soviet Jewish poet.

Fefer was born in the village of Shpola, in what is now Cherkassy Oblast. He became a member of the CPSU in 1919 and in the same year joined the Red Army as a volunteer. He fought in the Great Patriotic War (1941–45).

Fefer began publishing in 1919. The Civil War was the main theme of his lyric verse collections Chips of Wood (1922) and Of Myself and Those Like Me (1924) and of his narrative poems Josl Schinder (1925), The Boys (1925), and The Death ofll’ia (1928). The narrative poems Stone Upon Stone (1925), Layers (1932), and Great Borders (1939) were devoted to socialist construction. Fefer also wrote the plays The Chimney Sweep (1926) and The Sun Does Not Set (1947).

WORKS

Lieder, balades, poemes. [Foreword by G. Remenik.] Moscow, 1967.
In Russian translation:
Stikhi i poemy. Moscow, 1958.
Stikhi. Moscow, 1969.

REFERENCES

Dobrushin, I. “Fefer der Dichter.” In In iberboi. Moscow, 1932.
Remenik, G. “Der Dichter fun Sieg.” Sovetish Heimland, 1975, no. 9.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The visit of the two famous Soviet Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee leaders, Itzik Fefer and Shloime Mikhoels, to America in 1943 gave them enormous traction, as did the Soviet Union's support for the creation of the State of Israel in 1948.