Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk

Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk

 

(from 1905 to 1946, Toyohara), a city and administrative center of Sakhalin Oblast, RSFSR. Situated in the southeastern part of the island of Sakhalin, on the Susuia River. Junction of railroad lines to Korsakov, Kholmsk, and Poronaisk. Population, 134,000 (1977).

Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk has a machine-repair plant, a plant for the repair of diesel locomotives and railroad cars, a machine shop, an experimental machine-repair plant, a motor-vehicle repair plant, the Sakhalinzhelezobeton plant (reinforced concrete), the Stroidetal’ plant (construction components), the Sakhalinnerud plant (ores), and a fish-processing plant. It also has house-building and furniture combines and enterprises of light industry and the food industry. Located in Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk are the Sakhalin Integrated Scientific Research Institute of the Far East Scientific Center of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR and the Sakhalin Branch of the Pacific Scientific Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography. The city has a pedagogical institute, technicums of forestry and Soviet trade, and pedagogical and music schools. Also in the city are a museum of local lore and the A. P. Chekhov Drama Theater.

References in periodicals archive ?
Renamed Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk, the new capital in many ways became the center of Sakhalin District, comprising Sakhalin Island and the Kuriles after 1947.
Correspondents for regional newspapers and museum curators at the Sakhalin Museum of Regional Ethnography in Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk used a specific language to create narratives that gave the word "Sakhalin" new meaning after 1945.
To present a "proper" image of Soviet Sakhalin, the Museum of the Soviet Army and the Central Museum of the Revolution in Moscow supplied the museum in Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk with objects for exhibits on "30 Years of Soviet Power," "The Life of Comrade Stalin," and other topics they deemed adequate.
92) In Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk, however, the new provincial museum captions stressed the Red Army's heroism in the August 1945 campaign against "Japanese imperialists" just as it emphasized Russian heroism during the Russo-Japanese War four decades earlier.
The name of a suburban part of Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk derives from a village inhabited by exiled farmers between the 1880s and 1905, suggesting a Russian/Soviet continuity that has little to do with the actual development of urban structures.
It is but one example of the numerous attempts to reshape and reinterpret urban space after 1945- Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk (South Sakhalin), as the capital and administrative center of Sakhalin District, is the largest city on the island and the heart of political and cultural life.
118) When, after 1945, the first Soviet settlers arrived in Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk, most of Toyohara was still intact.
121) What makes Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk a typical Soviet city today is not so much a result of deliberate Sovietization as of gradual reconstruction and infrastructure modernization conducted by architects and city planners trained in the Soviet Union.
Because people continued to frequent the former center of Toyohara, the square in front of the main station developed as the center of Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk through gradual refurbishment.
126) The traditional center of Toyohara had become the new center of Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk.
The mixture of commemorative statues and the gradual introduction of a particular Soviet urban infrastructure turned Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk into a typical Soviet city.
One of the most interesting sites of memory in Iuzhno-Sakhalinsk is the provincial museum, one of the few places where traces of the Japanese history are still visible next to Soviet symbolism.