Izembek National Wildlife Refuge


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Izembek National Wildlife Refuge

Address:PO Box 127
Cold Bay, AK 99571

Phone:907-532-2445
Fax:907-532-2549
Web: izembek.fws.gov
Established: 1960 as Izembek National Wildlife Range; became Izembek NWR in 1980.
Location:Tip of the Alaska Peninsula.
Facilities:Visitor contact station.
Activities:Camping (no designated campsites), boating, kayaking, fishing, hiking, hunting.
Special Features:Refuge protects the watershed of Izembek Lagoon, an estuary containing one of the largest eelgrass beds in the world, which serves as an international crossroad to migrating waterfowl and shorebirds. The world's population of Pacific brant, thousands of Canada geese, and other waterfowl congregate on the lagoon from late August through early November. Each spring and fall the entire population of emperor geese migrate through Izembek, with several thousand wintering here.
Habitats: 417,533 acres of lakes, rivers, valleys, glaciers, snowfields, thermal springs, active volcanoes, and an estuary.
Access: Refuge headquarters is located in Cold Bay, a small remote community accessible only by aircraft or the state marine ferry system, which serves Cold Bay once a month from May to October. Limited vehicle access to the refuge is via 40 miles of gravel roads and trails; aircraft or boats are required for access elsewhere within the refuge.
Wild life: Black brant, Canada geese, emperor geese, Steller's eiders, tundra swan, harbor seals, sea otters, sea lions, whales, brown bears, caribou and salmon.

See other parks in Alaska.
References in periodicals archive ?
In response, Sierra Club Our Wild America Director Lena Moffitt released the following statement, Ryan Zinke and Donald Trump arent allowing a government shutdown to stop their attacks on our wild and public places as they careen the wrong way down a one-way street by reversing decades of protection for the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge.
The Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, a 315,000-acre preserve established in 1980 by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act--without consulting the Native peoples, King Cove residents note--is, indeed, home to a rich array of wildlife, notably of the winged variety: 155,000 Pacific black brant (almost the entire global population) visit each fall, as well as emperor geese (6,000) and Steller's eiders (23,000), to indulge in the eelgrass beds in the lagoons adjacent to the Refuge.
The Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, including its wilderness areas, is already crisscrossed by fifty miles of roads, left over from the days of rattling Army trucks (which, rest assured, took no great precautions on behalf of the eelgrass).
Building a Road Through the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge
Congress authorized the Secretary of the Interior to exchange lands within the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge for lands owned by the State of Alaska and the King Cove Corporation for the purpose of constructing a single-lane gravel road between the communities of King Cove and Cold Bay, Alaska.
Funding for this project was provided by the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, U.
In response, Sierra Club Land Protection Program Director Athan Manuel released the following statement, Donald Trump and Ryan Zinkes plan to construct a road through Izembek National Wildlife Refuge is as disastrous as it was when it was first proposed decades ago.
Trump and Zinke should instead review the options previously proposed by the Army Corps of Engineers, and develop a solution that meets the needs of local residents while protecting Izembek National Wildlife Refuge.
Reporting by CNN today reveals that Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is pushing for a road to be built through the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska.
In response, Athan Manuel, director of public land protection for the Sierra Club released the following statement, The proposed land swap and road through the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge remains as ill-advised as it was when first proposed.
06 percent of the 315,000-acre Izembek National Wildlife Refuge and is needed to facilitate an 11-mile, gravel, one-lane road segment that will connect two existing roads within and outside of the refuge.
Today, the House passed HR218 or the King Cove Road Land Exchange Act a bill that authorizes the building of a road through Alaskas Izembek National Wildlife Refuge.