Jacobean


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Jacobean

1. History characteristic of or relating to James I (1566--1625) of England or to the period of his rule (1603--25)
2. denoting, relating to, or having the style of architecture used in England during this period, characterized by a combination of late Gothic and Palladian motifs
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References in periodicals archive ?
The already existing tourist signs will get the St James' seashell, symbol of the Jacobean route.
He simultaneously asks: "is it possible to determine why the senses and the city became significantly entwined in dramatic performance during the particular historical context of Jacobean urban development?" (15).
Dame Emma |Kirkby, an expert on the 400-yearold songs of the Elizabethan and Jacobean era, who performed at Huddersfield University
Yet in his persuasive Environmental Degradation in Jacobean Drama, Bruce Boehrer argues that Jacobean dramatists (c.
Jacobean was a fast-finishing second in a strong maiden at the Curragh first time out.
Betfred, bet365 and Coral reacted by shortening Elm Park to 15-8, while Jacobean was last night the general 7-2 second favourite and Aloft a best-priced 12-1 shot with Coral (from 25).
Actress Eileen Atkins returns to the RSC after a break of 17 years to play Elizabeth Sawyer in The Witch of |Edmonton, a rarely-performed Jacobean domestic tragedy
Coral: 5-2 Elm Park, 7-2 Royal Navy Ship, 5 Celestial Path, 6 Jacobean, 7 Best Of Times, Giovanni Canaletto, 10 Snoano, 14 bar.
In response to this, Edward Chaney and Timothy Wilks look to the travellers of the early 17th century and see the curtain coming up on a new kind of travel, 'a Jacobean reconnaissance of Catholic Europe'.
The story draws from criminal court records, letters and journals from the period, as celebrity occultist Simon Forman, darling of the Jacobean chattering classes, guides the audience through a web of scandal, political manoeuvring and murder.
They cover the King's Printers' Bible monopoly in the reign of James I; purchases of special forms of prayers in English parishes 1558-1640; prayer book, polemic, and performance; print in the time of Jacobean parliaments; the fate of George Hakewill's writings in the context of the Spanish match; John Donne, James I, and the dilemmas of publication; Francis Bacon, King James, and the private revision of public negotiations; and the evolution of the English drill manual: soldiers, printers, and military culture.