Jacobite


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Jacobite: Jacobite rebellion, Jacobite Church

Jacobite

1. Brit History an adherent of James II (1633--1701, king of England, Ireland, and, as James VII, of Scotland, 1685--88) after his overthrow in 1688, or of his descendants in their attempts to regain the throne
2. a member of the Monophysite Church of Syria, which became a schismatic church in 451 ad
References in periodicals archive ?
NEW DEAL: John Eyre (left), Woodsome Hall pro, Chris Hanson (centre) and David Pitts of The Jacobite (s)
The two factions of the Malankara Church, namely the Malankara Orthodox Church and the Jacobite Syrian Church, have been warring over the ownership of the seminary and the church for decades.
Nostalgic zealots aside, contemporary observers, English as well as Scottish, tended to adopt viewpoints ranging from qualified endorsement of Jacobite aims to pronounced skepticism about the scope of secessionist sentiment nationwide, resulting in a "watch and wait attitude.
James II spent the remainder of his life under the protection of King Louis XIV of France, but his son James Francis Edward Stuart and grandson Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender (Bonnie Prince Charlie) attempted to restore the Jacobite line.
The Jacobite Express travels along the famous West Highland Railway Line.
On Wednesday, the Catholicose will lead a communion at Ruwi St Mary's Jacobite Church.
1745: Bonnie Prince Charlie (Charles Edward Stuart) and his Jacobite army defeated the English at the Battle of Prestonpans.
Good maps were seen by the Army as crucial in preventing Jacobite attempts on the throne.
The 96-page book, a diary authored by Thomas Tyldesley, a Jacobite involved in the plotting of the rebellion of 1715, had been given to the library for safekeeping by a descendent of Tyldesley's.
Stuart Reid's THE SCOTTISH JACOBITE ARMY 1945-46 (1846030730, $17.