Jacobite

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Jacobite

1. Brit History an adherent of James II (1633--1701, king of England, Ireland, and, as James VII, of Scotland, 1685--88) after his overthrow in 1688, or of his descendants in their attempts to regain the throne
2. a member of the Monophysite Church of Syria, which became a schismatic church in 451 ad
References in periodicals archive ?
amnesia in Ireland about Irish history and Jacobitism, which has
Elusively complex, ever aiming at a diversity of ends, Jacobitism has, not surprisingly, engendered a concomitantly tangled historiography--one that by extension highlights and illuminates the often contentious phenomenon known as "Britishness.
The belief that James was the legitimate ruler became known as Jacobitism (from Jacobus or Iacobus, Latin for James) a real stronghold of which was the Scottish Highlands and Islands.
34) The reprinting of Ane Detectioun in 1689 reflects a renewed interest in Mary Stuart, coinciding with the rise of Jacobitism in England from 1688, which sought to restore the Stuart king James II and his heirs to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland.
emerges for an attack upon superstition, Catholicism, Jacobitism and
Since restoration was precisely what mattered most in the Jacobite imagination, Jacobitism had a profounder affinity with neo-Latin than with a living language like Scots or English, and neo-Latin was the natural medium for Pitcairne's many Jacobite verses.
The lack of central purpose in the development of this Protestantism and the inability of the established Church to impose itself on the consciences of many British Protestants meant this "Protestant Empire," to Pestana's mind, was one defined by "Protestantism" in an essentially negative sense: Anglicans, Baptists, Methodists, Presbyterians, Quakers, and others might have had serious doctrinal differences, but they shared a general commitment to antipopery and the associated need for vigilance against the machinations of imperial rivals Spain and, later, France, as well as, after 1689, Jacobitism.
Hilletie came under scrutiny due to her ties to anti-Leislerians; Jacques and his wife testified against anti-Leislerian Robert Livingston when he was accused of Jacobitism (loyalty to the deposed King James II), a charge leveled against a number of anti-Leislerians.
This was a British establishment determined to annihilate Jacobitism - indicating how dangerous this political movement was thought to be.
O Buachalla, "Irish Jacobitism and Irish Nationalism" 109)
The defeat meant that in Scotland Jacobitism was for a generation 'little more than the cultural window-dressing of a slowly dwindling minority'.
Further, while Scott's attitude to Jacobitism accounts for some of the sense of alterity between past and present in his work, Porter, with an investment in continuity, is influenced by the Jacobite conception of history as cyclical.