Jacobus da Varagine

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Jacobus da Varagine

(jəkō`bəs dä värăj`ĭnē), c.1230–1298, Italian hagiographer, b. Varazze (then Voraggio), near Savona; also known as Jacobus de Voragine. He became a Dominican in 1244, was provincial of Lombardy, and after 1292 was archbishop of Genoa. Noted for his piety and great charity, he was beatified in 1816 and is revered as a saint in Genoa and Savona. He is remembered chiefly as the compiler of The Golden Legend (see Golden Legend, TheGolden Legend, The,
collection of saints' lives written in the 13th cent. by Jacobus da Varagine. Originally entitled Legenda sanctorum [readings in the lives of the saints], it soon came to be called Legenda aurea
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References in periodicals archive ?
A mediados del siglo xiii, el dominico Jacobus de Voragine (Giacoppo da Varaggio) redacto la Legenda sanctorum, que se convirtio en el libro mas popular del continente europeo.
In Search of Sacred Time: Jacobus de Voragine and the Golden Legend
Dailey begins with an insightful summary of the medieval inheritance, focusing on two main sources: the hugely influential Golden Legend of Jacobus de Voragine and English passion plays.
In creating his lively collection, Mirk drew heavily on accounts of saints' lives and miracles recounted in the immensely popular Legenda Aurea of Jacobus de Voragine.
The episodes cast by Riccio illustrate the story of the Invention of the True Cross as told in the Legenda aurea by Jacobus de Voragine, who devoted an entire chapter to the subject.
The Legenda Aurea of Jacobus de Voragine, compiled about 1260 and one of the most-read books of the High Middle Ages, gives sufficient details of the saints for each day of the liturgical year to inspire a homily on each occasion.
While it may be true, as Kleinberg says, that "the intellectual abilities of Jacobus de Voragine hardly measured up to those of Saint Thomas Aquinas or Henry of Ghent," scholars such as Sherry Reames and Alain Boureau have argued that Jacobus was well aware of the political and theological concerns of the church and structured his text accordingly (p.
She was instrumental in many important acquisitions, for example the Legenda aurea [Golden Legend] by Jacobus de Voragine, published in Venice in 1478.
In "Early Modern Catholic Piety in Translation," Carlos Eire (re)traces the influence of the late medieval devotional works that Ignatius of Loyola claimed had inspired him to leave soldiering and take up the cross, the Legenda aurea of Jacobus de Voragine and the Life of Christ of Ludolf of Saxony.
In his Golden Legend, Jacobus de Voragine recounts that St.
Thus, Jacobus de Voragine reads the name Magdalen as meaning "unconquered" or "magnificent" in one paragraph and states in the next that, being "the possessor of the fortified town of Magdala," Mary "thus came by the surname of Magdalen" (355-56).
In this particular case, the only other source that tells the Saint Luke story is the Legenda Aurea by the Dominican hagiologist Jacobus de Voragine.