Jacobus da Varagine

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Jacobus da Varagine

(jəkō`bəs dä värăj`ĭnē), c.1230–1298, Italian hagiographer, b. Varazze (then Voraggio), near Savona; also known as Jacobus de Voragine. He became a Dominican in 1244, was provincial of Lombardy, and after 1292 was archbishop of Genoa. Noted for his piety and great charity, he was beatified in 1816 and is revered as a saint in Genoa and Savona. He is remembered chiefly as the compiler of The Golden Legend (see Golden Legend, TheGolden Legend, The,
collection of saints' lives written in the 13th cent. by Jacobus da Varagine. Originally entitled Legenda sanctorum [readings in the lives of the saints], it soon came to be called Legenda aurea
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References in periodicals archive ?
Medieval chronicler Jacobus de Voragine compiled similarly bizarre stories about other saints in his book Golden Legend and is entirely to blame for his association with the story.
MS 132 is a Legenda aurea of the same period, either late thirteenth or early fourteenth century, also from Ramsey, with a likely pledge-note, and Thomson provides interesting information on the binding of the late-fifteenth-century Distinctiones, also by Jacobus de Voragine, which survives in MS 165.
Il rappelle la convocation du concile de Nicee par Constantin, ou l'arianisme est denonce par des raisonnements et par la mort miraculeuse d'Arius (JACOBUS DE VORAGINE, 1760b) qu'il raconte a deux reprises (JACOBUS DE VORAGINE, 1760a).
In Search of Sacred Time: Jacobus de Voragine and the Golden Legend
A mediados del siglo xiii, el dominico Jacobus de Voragine (Giacoppo da Varaggio) redacto la Legenda sanctorum, que se convirtio en el libro mas popular del continente europeo.
One of the most influential medieval Christian accounts of the lives of the saints, Jacobus de Voragine's The Golden Legend, tells the tale of a young prince named Josaphat, who discovers the inevitability of sickness, old age and death, reflects on the brevity and fragility of life, then decides to leave his luxurious palace to seek a path to the end to suffering.
Dailey begins with an insightful summary of the medieval inheritance, focusing on two main sources: the hugely influential Golden Legend of Jacobus de Voragine and English passion plays.
This coincided with the textual translation of her legend from early Greek and Latin versions recorded in the tenth and eleventh centuries, to the more extensive narrative of the Vulgata and the later legend recorded in Jacobus de Voragine's Legenda aurea (c.
In creating his lively collection, Mirk drew heavily on accounts of saints' lives and miracles recounted in the immensely popular Legenda Aurea of Jacobus de Voragine. Prior to the publication of Susan Powell's new edition, the only modern edition of Mirk's Festial was that of Theodor Erbe, Part I of which, containing the text and glossary, was published for the Early English Text Society in 1905.
The episodes cast by Riccio illustrate the story of the Invention of the True Cross as told in the Legenda aurea by Jacobus de Voragine, who devoted an entire chapter to the subject.
The Legenda Aurea of Jacobus de Voragine, compiled about 1260 and one of the most-read books of the High Middle Ages, gives sufficient details of the saints for each day of the liturgical year to inspire a homily on each occasion.
Jacobus de Voragine's Legenda Aurea and the Acta Pilati (from the Gospel of Nicodemus) had a considerable effect on the ways in which Pilate was cast in art.