Jacquard, Joseph Marie


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Jacquard, Joseph Marie

(zhôzĕf` märē` zhäkär`), 1752–1834, French inventor, whose loom is of the greatest importance in modern mechanical figure weaving. After several years of experimentation, he received a bronze medal for his model exhibited at the Industrial Exposition at Paris (1801). In 1806 his perfected loom was bought by the state and declared public property, and he was granted an annuity of 3,000 francs and a royalty on all looms sold. The Jacquard loomloom,
frame or machine used for weaving; there is evidence that the loom has been in use since 4400 B.C.

Modern looms are of two types, those with a shuttle (the part that carries the weft through the shed) and those without; the latter draw the weft from a stationary
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, the first machine to weave in patterns, has had countless adaptations in the modern textile industry.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Jacquard, Joseph Marie

 

Born July 7, 1752, in Lyon; died Aug. 7, 1834, in Oullins, department of the Rhone. French weaver and inventor.

In about 1800, Jacquard perfected a hand weaving loom by developing a device for producing fabrics with large designs. His invention attracted attention at an industrial exposition in Paris in 1801, and he was invited to Paris to work at the Museum (Conservatory) of Arts and Crafts. In 1808, Jacquard designed a new model of a machine for weaving in designs, the jacquard loom, which became widely used in weaving.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.